Jordan De Goey needs your support.

Australians are being asked to support AFL player Jordan De Goey as he struggles to cope with the self-inflicted scandals that have earned him three nominations for The Frownlow Medal this year.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

“Jordan’s had a tough year this year and it’s important that everyone in the country gets behind him in this time of need,” began a statement from the Collingwood Magpies.

“Aussies need to get behind one of their heroes, just as they got behind the diggers in WWI, and get him through this rough patch. The most important thing here is to protect Jordan’s welfare going forward, so that he can get back to playing great footy and being such a great Australian.”

Specifically, Australians are being asked to understand the hardship of the modern-day footballer and the enormous stress of being paid a fortune to play a game that you love, even while thousands of people lost their jobs during the pandemic. In addition, Aussies are asked to consider the stress of having to fly all the way to the United States, on a sponsor-funded trip, just to do a few sit ups and push ups.

“We’re also asking all Aussies to send positive affirmations and messages of support via social media, including a few ‘special’ photos if you know what I mean ladies,” winked his agent.

“He wouldn’t mind if people threw in a bit of beer money too.”

Aussies are also being reminded to support his sponsors by buying lots of Monster Energy drinks.

Image: NuNa

Anthony Milford does something newsworthy.

Anthony Milford Arrested for Assault is a better headline than ‘Anthony Milford Overpaid’ or ‘Anthony Milford Out of Form’. It’s also more likely to win him The Frownlow Medal in 2021.

The NRL player made headlines recently after being arrested in Brisbane for alleged assault of three people in the early hours of the morning. He was charged with three counts of assault occasioning bodily harm and one count of wilful damage.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

Milford is alleged to have become involved in an argument with his wife, and mother of his young child, as well as other people. He is said to have fled the scene. Police then hunted him though the streets of Fortitude Valley and arrested him, before making him spend the night in a police cell.

Alleged assault is also far more impressive than the incidents which earned Milford his previous Frownlow nominations. He was nominated for ‘liking’ Israel Folau’s famous homophobic social media post, and in previous years was nominated for a drunken incidents at the Canberra Raiders, and for breaking team curfew with the Queensland State of Origin team.

He leaves the Brisbane club this year after seven lacklustre seasons, and this could be the most memorable thing he does for the Broncos. Rabbitohs fans must be happy that they are already getting their money’s worth out of their 2022 recruit.

The alleged incident occurred near a nightclub called Ella Sabe, Spanish for She Knows. What does she know?

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Crowdfunding page established for Lachlan Lewis.

A Go Fund Me page has been set up for NRL player Lachlan Lewis after is was discovered that he can’t afford a pair of speakers. Organisers of The Frownlow Medal have established the page to celebrate his nomination and support him during this time of financial hardship.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

Lewis was allegedly caught by CCTV footage entering a room in the team hub in Queensland while wearing a hoodie, and stealing a soundbar speaker before placing it on eBay for sale. He has been stood down from the Canterbury Bulldogs while the NRL investigates the incident, which could end his NRL career. No one knows exactly why he did it and whether it was a practical joke, but sources can confirm that the speakers are so valuable they are out of reach for someone earning $A450,000 a year. For this reason, the Frownlow family is asking for Aussies to dig deep and help out one of our heroes.

Many people have lost work or income during COVID-19, so members of the public are being asked to reach into their hearts to help another innocent victim of the pandemic. The target is $3,000,000, and includes the likely future earnings of a talented young playmaker, who could have thrown his career away with this one bizarre act, as well as any associated legal costs.

Sources close to Lewis suspect he needed new speakers to launch a side hustle as a singer, podcaster, ASMR creator or Youtube star under the name of Lachie LooLoo. The ambitious sum will also help to pay for counselling when he inevitably blames mental health issues for the scandal.

Image: NuNa

Willie Rioli just couldn’t wait.

Willie Rioli was just three months away from ending a two-year drug ban from the AFL when he got himself arrested for drugs. Rioli was allegedly caught in possession of cannabis recently and earned his second nomination for The Frownlow Medal, as well as a second possible suspension from the sport.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

Rioli was first nominated for Frownlow honours in 2019 when he failed an ASADA drug test. Two weeks later, he tested positive again to metabolite cannabis on a match day in September, and was found guilty of two breaches relating to tampering with a urine sample, and one for the use of cannabis.

After the failed test and the suspension, Rioli said:

“I realise I have done wrong things and I have learned from it. I am sorry for letting people down. I am looking forward to putting all this behind me and playing footy again soon.”

It seems he may not have learned anything, as a police sniffer dog allegedly detected cannabis in his possession at Darwin airport recently. Rioli was living and playing lower-grade football in the top end while he sat out the two-year ban for the 2019 offence, and the courts will now decide if he ever returns to the field for the West Coast Eagles.

Rioli’s fall from grace is an unfortunate stain on a family of AFL royalty, which has produced many outstanding players across multiple generations. Willie’s nomination also comes on the exact same day that his cousin and Richmond player, Daniel, was also nominated for Frownlow honours.

Willie was supposed to be eligible for selection in August of this year, but now his AFL fate, and his chances of winning The Frownlow Medal, are in the hands of the judges.

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Manu Vatuvei and his second drug bust.

Former NRL player Manu Vatuvei has been nominated for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame after being accused of his second drug-related scandal. Vatuvei was accused of importing illicit drugs into New Zealand just three years after he scored his first Frownlow nomination for a separate drug controversy.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

The New Zealand international could face life in prison after recently revealing that in 2019 he was charged with possessing methamphetamine for supply and importing the Class A drug. Vatuvei finally confessed to being the subject of the charges when he posted a message on social media.

“In 2019 I was charged with importation, possession and supply of methamphetamine. All of these charges are accusations and I will be fighting my innocence for these charges. I know there’ll be a lot of questions … but I’ve been advised from my legal team that’s all I can talk about.”

The bullocking winger is no stranger to drug controversies. In 2016 he was nominated for The Frownlow Medal after being stood down by the Warriors for his poor attitude and for mixing prescription drugs with energy drinks on a night out.

The cult hero now joins a select group of footballers who have been nominated for The Frwonwlow Medal and The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame. The question is, will he join an even more select group of footballers serving time behind bars?

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Suliasi Vunivalu starts his Rugby career with a whimper.

Powerful attacking weapon Suliasi Vunivalu has started his Super Rugby career with a whimper after being forced to miss his first game due to an off-field incident.

Vunivalu has been dropped from the Queensland Reds first game of 2021 after he was accused of pushing a security guard at a licensed venue in Brisbane. The controversy also earned the star recruit a $10,000 fine and a very tame nomination for The Frownlow Medal.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

Vunivalu is one of the highest profile recruits for the Super Rugby competition in 2021. He won premierships with the Melbourne Storm in the NRL and trained with the Wallabies in late 2020, after impressing Rugby coaches with his raw athleticism and try scoring potential. Now he won’t even play the first game of the season against arch rivals NSW.

The Fijian-born star will have to work hard to win the trust of his new teammates, and to win The Frownlow Medal in 2021.

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Payne Haas confesses to intimidation.

NRL player Payne Haas has admitted to intimidation but denies charges of intimidating police officers. The young superstar claims he was attempting to intimidate Queenslanders when he was arrested and that he would never mistreat police because “…they wear blue.”

Haas explained that he was hurling abuse at Queenslanders ahead of the 2021 footy season when he was arrested in Tweed Heads recently, because he is still angry at losing the 2020 State of Origin series.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

“I wanna win Origin this year,” stated Haas.

“I can’t believe we lost to their reserve grade team last year, and I’m not gonna go through that again this year – so I went as close to Queensland as possible and started just yelling stuff at random Queenslanders from across the border.”

“I just love intimidating Queenslanders, but I couldn’t get into the state because of the whole coronavirus restrictions, so I just had to yell at them from the other side of the river. If we wanna win Origin this year, we’ve gotta get in early, especially if they get all their top players back this year.”

Police arrested Haas on charges of intimidation and verbal abuse, and reports allege that he was intoxicated at the time.

“I still don’t know why I was arrested. I reckon the cops must secretly be Queenslanders.”

The talented prop was lost for words, however, when he was reminded that he plays his club football for Queensland’s most popular team.

It’s not the forward’s first run in with police. In 2019 he appeared in court over two drink-driving incidents, and in the same year he was suspended and fined by the Broncos for refusing to cooperate with the NRL integrity unit in relation to two off-field incidents.

Whether or not the young New South Welshman’s efforts prove effective will be known later in the year.

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Brad Crouch and Tyson Stengle find a cure for coronavirus.

AFL players Brad Crouch and Tyson Stengle are adamant that the illicit drugs allegedly found in their possession are a guaranteed cure for coronavirus. The Adelaide Crows pair were stopped by police in the early hours of Monday morning and their discovery of a cure for the deadly virus has earned them nominations for The Frownlow Medal.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL player Ben Barba is the most recent recipient.

Crouch and Stengle apparently caught the attention of police in the Adelaide city centre because their tiny AFL shorts were bursting with a suspicious package. Officers first suspected them of trying to attract the attention the Footy Fondlers like Jack Riewoldt and Nick Vlastuin, but upon inspection it was discovered that the players were carrying bags of multi-coloured pills.

Crouch and Stengle explained to the officers that they had acquired the pills from an unknown source and were going home to personally test them before making them available to the public. For this reason, police did not charge the pair.

The remarkable discovery explains why South Australia recently reopened its borders to other states except Victoria. Local businesses and interstate travellers are hailing the players as heroes for saving the nation’s economy and putting a smile on people’s faces.

The corona cure earns Stengle his second Frownlow nomination for 2020. Earlier in the year he was charged with drink driving in an unregistered car while disqualified from driving.

The duo is expected to bring a truckload of their special pills to the awards night for The Frownlow Medal and The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame later this year. Just to keep everyone safe.

Image: NuNa

Jordan de Goey did not assault his dog.

AFL player Jordan de Goey has staunchly denied any allegation that he sexually assaulted his dog. He may or may not have assaulted a woman in 2015, but he certainly did not assault his dog.

The recent allegations against de Goey relate to an incident concerning a woman in 2015, which have only now come to light, and have earned the Collingwood player his third nomination for The Frownlow Medal.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL player Ben Barba is the most recent recipient.

De Goey is presumed innocent until a verdict is reached, so we don’t know if he assaulted the woman. What is certain is that he did not assault his dog, because he owes his dog big time. The dog in question is the one de Goey blamed for injuring his hand and missing a number of games a few years ago. The hand injury earned de Goey his first Frownlow nomination because it later emerged that de Goey had actually injured it in an incident at a nightclub. He just didn’t tell the truth to anyone, not even coach Nathan Buckley, who was forced to tell the dog story to the media and stick up for his player in front of the cameras.

De Goey’s second Frownlow nomination came after a drink-driving incident, but was also not enough to win the prestigious medal. Will it be third time lucky?

An allegation of sexual assault is a very serious allegation and infinitely more serious than the Tik Tok videos and social distancing breaches which have earned other footballers Frownlow nominations in recent weeks. However, even if found guilty of sexual assault, this may not be enough to guarantee de Goey The Frownlow Medal this year. Both Jack de Belin and Jarryd Hayne are still waiting for their sexual assault cases to be heard, so the fight for the Frownlow will be very tough in 2020.

To borrow a cliche, a week is a long time in footy, so a year is a very long time – and that is why de Goey will have to wait patiently to see if he has done enough to win The Frownlow Medal.

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Josh Reynolds: All I want for Christmas is The Frownlow Medal.

With Christmas just around the corner, Josh Reynolds is hoping Santa brings him the ultimate present this year, The Frownlow Medal.

The NRL player earned a nomination for the highly-prestigious award just moments before judging closes, after he was charged with domestic violence.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015 and code-swapper Karmichael Hunt was the most recent recipient.

Reynolds was charged with a domestic violence offence and defends the charge. He is happy, however, that the charge was handed down before 2019 officially ends and the winner of The Frownlow Medal is announced. He is also no stranger to Frownlow judges, having been nominated in 2017 for refusing to leave a pub while intoxicated.

The award would look great in his stocking and would be the perfect way to kick off a huge New Year’s Eve celebration with the boys.

Reynolds faces tough opposition, though, in the form of Zane Musgrove, Scott Bolton, Manase Fainu, Jaidyn Stephenson, Jack de Belin, Jarryd Hayne and serial homophobe Israel Folau.

Image: NuNa