Collingwood Magpies launch Fakebook.

Collingwood Football Club has launched a new social media platform called Fakebook after Jack Ginnivan and Isaac Quaynor were caught rating the attractiveness of women online.

Ginnivan and Quaynor have earned nominations for The Fronwlow Medal for the deleted Tik Tok post, and will spearhead the new social media platform created to rival Facebook.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL star Jarryd Hayne is the most recent recipient.

Fakebook will be like Facebook in every way, even in it’s creation.

“You know how Facebook was created?” asked Ginnivan at the launch of Fakebook at the MCG.

“By rating women,” explained Quaynor.

“That’s right,” they continued. “That Zuckerberg guy got dropped by his girlfriend or something, so he started a website rating the physical attractiveness of women on his college campus in the States – now it’s a mega corporation.”

“Well, we can rate the physical appearance of women online, so we started Fakebook with some help from the Magpies.”

The players created controversy when they filmed themselves laying in bed, rating the features of women as part of a viral game on TikTok.

“But we’re better than Zuckerberg,” they stated.

“See, we don’t just rate their appearance, we re-rate them after new information is revealed. Zuckerberg didn’t think of that.”

In the viral video, the players say things like:

“She’s a 10, but got some … teeth, like them teeth are going every which way, diagonal, everything,”

“F***** hell. Four.”

“She’s a nine and a half, but is homeless.”

“Two and a half.”

Magpies bosses, still on a high after Jordan De Goey’s latest Frownlow nomination, explained the decision to appoint Ginnivan and Quaynor as ambassadors of Fakebook.

“Ginnivan and Quaynor have proven their ability to rate women based purely on physical appearance, and this is why they will be the faces of the new platform.”

“Furthermore, the TikTok post is crass, immature, popular, lame, offensive, poorly-made and divisive, and this is exactly the kind of content which has made Facebook so successful. Fakebook will be even more successful because all of it’s content will be produced by professional footballers.”

The TikTok video which prompted the creation of Fakebook showed Ginnivan and Quaynor giving women constantly low ratings, which might explain why they’re lying in bed together shirtless.

Image: http://www.onlymelbourne.com.au

Jordan De Goey has had enough.

Jordan De Goey is fed up. He’s sick of it. He’s had enough.

The AFL player is sick and tired of being nominated for The Frownlow Medal again and again and never winning the award. For Jordan, enough is enough.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL star Jarryd Hayne is the most recent recipient.

De Goey is so angry at not winning the medal that he used a phrase/hashtag that is used to highlight entrenched gender inequality or the plight of mass shooting victims in the USA. On a recent social media rant attacking the media and other critics, he used the phrase ‘enough is enough’ to compare his plight to the plight of people who suffer some of the worst fate imaginable.

The post provoked a massive response from the media, De Goey’s fans, former players and many other people, but they all missed one important fact. What frustrates De Goey more than anything is not winning The Frownlow Medal.

“Enough is Enough,” he said.

“What else do I have to do?”

“I’ve been nominated so many times for this award and still no medal. Nothing.”

“Look, I got nominated in 2017, 2018 and 2020, then in 2021 I got nominated 3 times for three separate incidents, and now in 2022 I’ve got two nominations. Fair dinkum, what’s a guy gotta do?”

“Even this time, I put in the hard yards for a nomination. I went to Bali – which is full of drunken Aussie bogans – and where everyone ends up doing something stupid. Then I went to a club, I made all these rude gestures to the camera and it went viral. You think it’s easy doing that? You think it just happens? No, it takes planning, the right club, the right lighting, enough refreshments and the right time of the night to act like that – but still no medal. And then, at one point, someone in the video tries to get a chick to take her top off and expose her breasts when she’s lying on the bar, I mean, that’s basically sexual harassment if you think about it, but will I win the medal this year, who knows?”

“And even after that I cried about being mistreated by the media and created even more controversy. I mean, The Frownlow Medal lives off controversy, and I’ve given them enough controversy in the last few years…”

Is De Goey right. Has he done enough to win The Fronwlow Medal in 2022?

Image: Getty Images

Football’s greatest bromance.

Help us find football’s greatest bromance. Help us choose the teammates who broke each other’s bones as well as each other’s hearts before kissing and making up for the sake of the team?

The Fronwlow Medal takes a close look at some of the most passionate pairings in Australian professional football and takes a trip down memory lane to highlight some of the most romantic Frownlow nominations in history.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL star Jarryd Hayne is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Football’s greatest bromances:

NRL

James Tedesco and Shannon Wakeman

Daly Cherry Evans and Jackson Hastings

Jamal Idris, Lee Te Maari and Ben Barba,

plus fellow Bulldogs Corey Allen and Jacob Kiraz

Brisbane Broncos:

Corey Oates and Justin Hodges

Payne Haas and Albert Kelly

Tom Flegler and Jordan Riki

Super Rugby

Matt Dunning and Des Tuiavi’i

Amanaki Mafi and Lopeti Timani

AFL

Steven May and Jake Melksham

No, Wayne Carey does not qualify for this particular award. He had a romance with his teammate’s wife, not his teammate.

West Coast Eagles:

Daniel Kerr and Ben Cousins

Daniel Connors and Ben Cousins

Daniel Chick and Andrew Embley (prompted by Ben Cousins)

Do you know of any football bromance, from Australia’s four major codes, which should be included in this list?

Image: Tyler Nix

Bailey Smith quits AFL.

Bailey Smith has shocked Australia with news that he will quit the AFL to deal with mental health issues following his latest off-field scandal.

Smith was recently punished for appearing in a social media post holding a bag of white powder, and he raised mental health battles when discussing the incident with the media. He has since quit the sport entirely to start a new career.

“I will step aside from the AFL immediately,” Smith announced through a prepared statement.

“I have made this difficult decision for reasons of mental health. My battles with mental health have been well documented, even after my latest off-field scandal and subsequent nomination for The Fronwlow Medal.”

His next career move was as big a shock as his decision to leave the sport.

“I will spend six months of the year as a school teacher and the next six months as a nurse, so that I can gain a more accurate understanding of mental health struggles,” the Western Bulldogs star explained.

“I will teach secondary students, most likely as a PD/H/PE teacher, for the remainder of this year. I chose teaching because I want to learn exactly what mental health struggles look like. I want to experience the constant drain of secondary school teaching in underfunded schools where teachers are overworked and underpaid and constantly under attack from parents and students. I want to understand the mental health strain on people who are vital to the nation but are completely undervalued and often criticised by Australian society, in contrast to footballers who are adored for simply playing a game they love.”

“On a personal note, I want to feel what it’s like to be ignored, teased, criticised or even physically attacked by teenagers, including some who’ll become professional footballers in a few years time. If you’d heard the stories the boys tell in the locker room about their school days, you’d know what I mean.”

Australians were just as shocked to learn that a person with no teaching experience or qualifications could simply walk into a full-time teaching position, but such is the shortage of teachers in Australia – created largely through the mental health strain placed on teachers.

After teaching for six months, Smith then plans to work as a nurse.

“I will work as a nurse for similar reasons,” he outlined.

“I want to truly understand the mental health strain of working an extremely stressful and underpaid job which was made a lot worse during the pandemic, and was bad enough before COVID-19.”

“I want to live through the emotional and psychological strain of caring for sick, injured, scared, smelly, dirty, abused, unstable, violent, dying people on a daily basis without proper remuneration or even adequate personal protection equipment.”

“I also want to be on the other side when a professional footballer abuses drugs or alcohol and has to be saved from themselves.”

Bailey then explained exactly why he had chosen these two careers above any other.

“Above all, I want to know what it’s like to be given gratitude instead of a reasonable wage.”

The nursing and teaching jobs will keep Smith out of the AFL until June 2023. Will the social media darling be back in the AFL, and back into contention for The Fronwlow Medal?

Only time will tell. Or maybe he will be back on the field once he reviews his bank balance.

Image: AAP, James Ross

More details emerge in Bailey Smith saga.

Bailey Smith‘s chances of winning The Frownlow Medal have increased after more details of his off-field behaviour emerged. The AFL star recently earned his first nomination for a controversial social media image but apparently this is not his first scandal.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL star Jarryd Hayne is the most recent recipient.

Smith recently hit the headlines when an image went viral on social media showing him holding a bag of white powder and smiling. It is not clear what is in the bag, and there is no evidence Smith consumed the substance. Since that controversy, more details have emerged which increase his chances of beating the 19 other nominees for The Frownlow Medal in 2022.

The viral image was apparently taken at a party in late 2021, and at the same time another photo was taken showing Smith ‘wiping his nose after leaning over’. The implications are strong, although again nothing has been proven, and perhaps the Western Bulldogs player simply had a cold.

This is not all, however.

At the time the photos were taken, Smith was apparently on a mental health break from AFL, but took that break after an investigation into complaints that he was behaving badly at a Gold Coast club and had to be spoken to by authorities.

Also in 2021, Smith created yet more controversy just moments into his young career. He appeared in another social media video boasting of his intention to pursue temporary connections with various women during a night out with friends, and said so in a way that was in not at all romantic.

The behaviour of a true role model.

The social media star surrounded himself in controversy even earlier in his career when photos of him emerged on the internet apparently naked, or close to naked. Smith was not responsible for the photos, which had been doctored by someone else, but he famously reacted to the scandal by posting an emoji of an eggplant, and his many social media followers know exactly what that means.

Smith and his legion of fans are anxious to know if he will face consequences for his latest scandal, but the most important question is, has he done enough to win The Frownlow Medal?

Image: AAP, James Ross

Kids should copy Bailey Smith.

AFL player Bailey Smith proved he is a great role model for young people after appearing in a viral social media image holding a bag of white powder and earning a nomination for The Frownlow Medal.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL star Jarryd Hayne is the most recent recipient.

Smith is one of the most popular and marketable faces of the AFL and is used in countless promotions for his club and the game of Australian Rules. He’s also not afraid to market himself and has the most social media followers of almost any Australian footballer. In addition, scores of Aussie kids try to grow their hair to emulate his famous flowing blonde mullet and this image appears in advertisements for the AFL and corporations.

The social media image shows Smith holding a small bag of an unknown white powder and smiling at the camera. There is no evidence that Smith in any way touched or consumed the powder, or exactly what is contained in the bag.

Once the AFL complete their investigation into the issue, Smith will find out if he faces any sanctions, and if he is a strong chance of winning the Frownlow in 2022.

The sporting ‘role model’ is no stranger to off field controversy, however. In 2021, he took a break from AFL after a late night police complaint was made against him at a pub on the Gold Coast. Following this incident, he did the inevitable media interview outlining his struggles with mental health. Perhaps the white powder helps him deal with his mental health issues. This incident also strengthens his nomination for this year’s Frownlow.

Smith might lose his title as ‘role model’, at least until the next AFL off-field scandal, but all is not lost. The video proves that he definitely deserves his invitation to the awards night for The Frownlow Medal and The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame later this year, where even the most mysterious substances are welcome.

Image: AAP, James Ross

Michael Fredrick lowers the tone.

AFL player Michael Frederick has been accused of tarnishing the reputation of The Fronwlow Medal after being suspended for drinking alcohol. The Fremantle Dockers rookie was punished by his leadership and forced to learn the history of the greatest prize in Australian sport.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL star Jarryd Hayne is the most recent recipient.

Frederick has been suspended for one match after consuming alcohol during a six-day break between games, which was regarded as a breach of agreed team standards. He also prompted the standard press release from his club about remorse, team standards, culture, support, moving forward…

Frederick will spend the week reading articles on this website and studying http://www.instagram.com/thefrownlowmedal to learn how a real Frownlow nominee should behave. While he is not being encouraged to assault or harass women, he will see that a true nomination involves much more alcohol, or offences such as illicit drug use, public urination, severe homophobia, racism, destruction of property, theft, manslaughter, prison sentences, drug trafficking, bestiality, gambling on your own game or pooing in a shoe.

He can then put into practice what he learned at the awards night for The Fronwlow Medal later this year.

Image: AFL Photos

Steven May and Jake Melksham take their bromance to the screen.

AFL players Steven May and Jake Melksham will star in an undisclosed reality TV show this year after forming football’s latest steamy bromance. The Melbourne teammates had a public tiff and have been promised starring roles in numerous reality TV shows as well as nominations for The Frownlow Medal.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL star Jarryd Hayne is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

May and Melksham were dining at a Melbourne restaurant when their playful banter escalated into a passionate ‘scuffle’ as their feelings overflowed. News spread quickly and TV producers contacted their agents immediately.

May was suspended for one game by the Demons leadership group, because he was not supposed to be drinking while recovering from an injury, while both players will take part in community service “…to ensure they understand the responsibility and impact they have as role models within the community.”

Like all committed partners, and all professional footballers, May and Melksham are incredibly ‘remorseful’ of their actions and are said to have kissed and made up. In this way they are following the example of other football bromances and Frownlow nominees, such as NRL players Corey Oates and Justin Hodges, Daly Cherry-Evans and Jackson Hastings, James Tedesco and Shannon Wakeman, as well as Rugby players Matt Dunning and Des Tuiavi’i.

The interest of reality show producers indicates the depth of feeling in the scuffle, although it lacks the intrigue of the threesome involving NRL players Jamal Idris, Lee Te Maari and 2019 medallist Ben Barba.

Closer to home, West Coast Eagles teammates Daniel Kerr and Cousins had a famous fist fight in 2002.

The Melbourne veterans are yet to decide on a name for their pairing. They considered MenM but they’re not rappers, so are tossing up M2, MelMay, MaMey and Stemay Jake, and have asked their social media followers to vote on a name. What is certain, however, is that the players will use the TV roles to release a single entitled: “Jake’s Melksham brings all the boys to the yard”

MelMay will find out later this year if they become the first couple to share The Fronwlow Medal, and viewers will find out later this year which reality TV show will feature the streamy bromance.

Image: http://www.dailymail.co.uk

Brennan Stack earns a Wife Beater Tattoo.

Former AFL player Brennan Stack has earned a Wife Beater Tattoo from The Frownlow Medal after pleading guilty to violently assaulting women.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL star Jarryd Hayne is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Horrific CCTV footage caught Stack and another man, Shai Martin, attacking two young women in March 2022. The women were left with serious injuries and were taken to hospital, while a third woman was also assaulted during the incident.

According to the CCTV footage, Stack is shown punching and hitting one of the women until she passes out. Martin then appears to drag one of the women along the ground by her hair, while both men are seen kicking a woman in the head. One of the women attempts to escape by crawling along the ground, but is seen and prevented from escaping. Reports also indicate that the players stomped on the victims’ heads and threw a bottle at one – at times while the women were unconscious.

Footage indicates that the incident ends when the police arrive.

What started the alleged assault?

Apparently an argument over car doors slamming into one another.

Stack had been a mentor in the AFL community and took up the head coaching role at Nollamara Football Club in 2022, but was removed from the role once news broke of the incident.

The former Western Bulldogs player will receive his Wife Beater Tattoo in prison where he has been remanded in custody before a further trial later in the year. The tattoo will be inked on the arm he used to assault his victims.

Image: NuNa

Do professional footballers go to school?

One would be forgiven for thinking that professional footballers in Australia have never been to school, because apparently they are not prepared for life after football.

Almost every time a player is caught in a scandal and nominated for The Fronwlow Medal Hall of Fame, someone blames the player’s actions on the lack of preparation for life in the real world. Surely that is the purpose of school, to prepare children for life in the real world.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL star Jarryd Hayne is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

So, if professional footballers have been to school, even if they finish school aged 16 or 17, why are so many of them not prepared for life after sport?

Blame the schools.

That’s not fair, because most of the footballers’ classmates avoid scandals once they enter the real world.

Blame the teachers.

Many people will, and they’re not just footballers. Australian society loves blaming teachers for all of the ills and failures of its youth, but teachers are not to blame.

Blame the players.

Perhaps the footballers themselves are to blame for their inability to cope with life after football. Many school teachers will be familiar with the following scenarios:

Young footballers don’t listen to their teachers.

They don’t study.

They don’t do their classwork.

They don’t do their homework.

They disrupt classes.

They distract their classmates.

They disobey teachers.

They swear at teachers.

Teenage football stars say they don’t have to work hard at school because they are guaranteed a career in professional football. So they don’t work at school. The future footy stars are already earning more than their teachers because they are contracted to a club’s development team and believe they don’t have to study.

Teenage football heroes are notorious for their poor attitude at school, so much so that footy legends joke about their school boy antics during commentary. England international and former NRL player James Graham recently joked about skipping school to watch State of Origin as a child in England. Perhaps the attitude and actions of teenage footballers during their school years explains why they are not prepared for life after sport.

Roger Bannister

Roger Bannister was possibly the Usain Bolt of his generation. When he broke the four minute mile he was elevated to hero status for achieving the most sought-after feat of that era. At the time, the four minute mile was equivalent to the 10-second barrier for the 100m, the 2-hour barrier for the marathon or the 6-metre barrier for Pole Vault. Bannister was a global superstar, and even though he competed before the creation of the internet, professionalism, sponsorship and social media, he was surrounded by the fame of his achievement.

What did Bannister do after retiring from Athletics?

Did he get caught drink driving, assaulting someone, abusing alcohol, selling drugs or harassing women?

No, he returned to university to complete his medical degree.

Perhaps the ‘role models’ of today could use Bannister as their own ‘role model’. They don’t have to complete a medical degree, but they could follow his lead and devote themselves to something constructive which sets them up for life, instead of blaming their club or their sport for their scandalous behaviour.

Setting themselves up for life begins at school.

Image: Getty Images