Football’s greatest bromance.

Help us find football’s greatest bromance. Help us choose the teammates who broke each other’s bones as well as each other’s hearts before kissing and making up for the sake of the team?

The Fronwlow Medal takes a close look at some of the most passionate pairings in Australian professional football and takes a trip down memory lane to highlight some of the most romantic Frownlow nominations in history.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL star Jarryd Hayne is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Football’s greatest bromances:

NRL

James Tedesco and Shannon Wakeman

Daly Cherry Evans and Jackson Hastings

Jamal Idris, Lee Te Maari and Ben Barba,

plus fellow Bulldogs Corey Allen and Jacob Kiraz

Brisbane Broncos:

Corey Oates and Justin Hodges

Payne Haas and Albert Kelly

Tom Flegler and Jordan Riki

Super Rugby

Matt Dunning and Des Tuiavi’i

Amanaki Mafi and Lopeti Timani

AFL

Steven May and Jake Melksham

No, Wayne Carey does not qualify for this particular award. He had a romance with his teammate’s wife, not his teammate.

West Coast Eagles:

Daniel Kerr and Ben Cousins

Daniel Connors and Ben Cousins

Daniel Chick and Andrew Embley (prompted by Ben Cousins)

Do you know of any football bromance, from Australia’s four major codes, which should be included in this list?

Image: Tyler Nix

Matt Dunning Drops One on His Teammate in Race for Frownlow Honours.

Former Super Rugby player Matt Dunning broke the nose of a teammate in a determined effort to be inducted into The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame.

Dunning broke the nose of Waratahs teammate Des Tuiavii in 2003 during a drunken end-of-season celebration at which he was also accused of annoying members of the public.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. Former NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015 and fellow NRL star Jarryd Hayne is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

The former Wallaby claimed the incident occurred after he drank too much in order to forget about his ill-advised drop goal attempt which severely damaged the Waratahs chances of victory in the Super Rugby competition.

Sources from within the Waratahs camp, however, revealed the true cause of the scuffle between two gentlemen engaged in The Game They Play in Heaven. Both players had apparently volunteered to collect the next round of drinks from the bar, when the following conversation ensued.

“I insist,” said Dunning.

“No, I insist,” replied Tuiavii.

“No, Sir, you are far too kind.”

“No, please, allow me”

“No, I couldn’t possibly, I simply won’t allow it.”

“Your valour knows no end good Sir, but I implore you to allow me to procure the refreshments for our party…”

‘Whack!’ Dunning punches Tuiavii in the face.

“As I said, I insist”

Image: NuNa

Do professional footballers go to school?

One would be forgiven for thinking that professional footballers in Australia have never been to school, because apparently they are not prepared for life after football.

Almost every time a player is caught in a scandal and nominated for The Fronwlow Medal Hall of Fame, someone blames the player’s actions on the lack of preparation for life in the real world. Surely that is the purpose of school, to prepare children for life in the real world.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL star Jarryd Hayne is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

So, if professional footballers have been to school, even if they finish school aged 16 or 17, why are so many of them not prepared for life after sport?

Blame the schools.

That’s not fair, because most of the footballers’ classmates avoid scandals once they enter the real world.

Blame the teachers.

Many people will, and they’re not just footballers. Australian society loves blaming teachers for all of the ills and failures of its youth, but teachers are not to blame.

Blame the players.

Perhaps the footballers themselves are to blame for their inability to cope with life after football. Many school teachers will be familiar with the following scenarios:

Young footballers don’t listen to their teachers.

They don’t study.

They don’t do their classwork.

They don’t do their homework.

They disrupt classes.

They distract their classmates.

They disobey teachers.

They swear at teachers.

Teenage football stars say they don’t have to work hard at school because they are guaranteed a career in professional football. So they don’t work at school. The future footy stars are already earning more than their teachers because they are contracted to a club’s development team and believe they don’t have to study.

Teenage football heroes are notorious for their poor attitude at school, so much so that footy legends joke about their school boy antics during commentary. England international and former NRL player James Graham recently joked about skipping school to watch State of Origin as a child in England. Perhaps the attitude and actions of teenage footballers during their school years explains why they are not prepared for life after sport.

Roger Bannister

Roger Bannister was possibly the Usain Bolt of his generation. When he broke the four minute mile he was elevated to hero status for achieving the most sought-after feat of that era. At the time, the four minute mile was equivalent to the 10-second barrier for the 100m, the 2-hour barrier for the marathon or the 6-metre barrier for Pole Vault. Bannister was a global superstar, and even though he competed before the creation of the internet, professionalism, sponsorship and social media, he was surrounded by the fame of his achievement.

What did Bannister do after retiring from Athletics?

Did he get caught drink driving, assaulting someone, abusing alcohol, selling drugs or harassing women?

No, he returned to university to complete his medical degree.

Perhaps the ‘role models’ of today could use Bannister as their own ‘role model’. They don’t have to complete a medical degree, but they could follow his lead and devote themselves to something constructive which sets them up for life, instead of blaming their club or their sport for their scandalous behaviour.

Setting themselves up for life begins at school.

Image: Getty Images

Bizarre new contract clause for professional footballers.

Professional footballers in Australia have been ordered to get a pet dog in order to protect their public image after an off-field scandal.

Footballers from the four major codes have had the clause included in their contracts in case they commit an incident which earns them a nomination for The Fronwlow Medal or The Fronwlow Medal Hall of Fame.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL star Jarryd Hayne is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

“Australians will forgive anyone who owns a dog,” began a statement from the marketing firm contracted to oversee brand recovery across the four codes.

“Many professional footballers in Australia have a great need to repair their personal brand and this is why they will be required to buy a pet dog upon signing a contract to play first-grade in any of the four major codes.”

The branding experts explained that the pre-emptive clause assumes that every player will at some point commit a scandal that will bring themselves and their sport into disrepute.

“One needs only browse through http://www.instagram/thefrownlowmedal.com to see how many footballers commit scandals and to understand why this clause is necessary.”

The clause might surprise many Australians, until they consider the power of a photograph with a cute dog. It is seemingly impossible to advertise a product in Australia without including a dog, and the country’s most popular children’s TV series features a family of animated dogs. Australia also carries an unspoken belief that dog ownership improves people’s character and thus makes every footballer a great role model to young children.

Disgraced celebrities, sports stars and even politicians also understand the recuperative power of a photo with a pooch.

“Scott Morrison is a perfect example,” continued the PR experts, “throughout his less than stellar career as prime minister he has regularly been photographed with a pet dog, especially when his popularity falls. His opponent, Anthony Albanese, also made sure he included a dog in his photo ops during his recent isolation, proving that Aussies will forgive anyone who owns a dog.”

“If a dog can repair the brand of an Aussie politician, it will repair the brand of a footballer.”

A photo with a canine will apparently protect a footballer’s personal brand from alcohol and drug abuse, driving offences and social media gaffs, as well as racism, sexism and homophobia, and even from crimes such as assault, manslaughter, murder and sexual assault.

“It’s amazing how many Frownlow Medallists and hall of fame inductees could have been saved with nothing more than a photo with a dog.”

Image: NuNa

Albert Proud joins The Frownlow Medal Wife Beaters Club.

Former AFL player Albert Proud is the latest professional footballer to join The Frownlow Medal Wife Beaters Club after pleading guilty to assaulting his former partner.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, and NRL star Jarryd Hayne is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Proud was sentenced to five and a half years in prison for seriously injuring his girlfriend during a drunken assault in 2015. He pleaded guilty to grievous bodily harm and wilful damage, but could have faced a murder charge had the woman not received medical attention immediately after the assault.

Reports indicate that Proud punched his girlfriend in the chest and attempted to strangle her after getting drunk at a friend’s wedding. The injuries were so severe that the woman spent 33 days in hospital and suffered lasting injuries.

This was not the first allegation of assault against Proud. The Brisbane Lions suspended him in 2009 after accusations of assault from a 23-year-old woman in a Gold Coast nightclub. Proud took leave from the club a year later to deal with alcohol issues. The Lions finally parted ways with him in 2011 after he assaulted a police officer.

Proud joins the following players in The Fronwlow Medal Wife Beaters Club:

NRL

Kenny Edwards

Zane Tetevano

Ben Barba

Jake Friend

Anthony Watts

Isaac Gordon

Richie Fa’aoso

Anthony Cherrington

Addin Fonua-Blake

Kirisome Auva’a

Jarryd Hayne

Jamil Hopoate

Joel Romelo

AFL

Elijah Taylor

Nick Stevens

Liam Jurrah

Andrew Lovett

Wayne Carey

Albert Proud

Rugby Union

Craig Wells

Image: NuNa

Joel Romelo joins The Frownlow Medal Wife Beaters Club.

Former NRL player Joel Romelo is the latest footballer to join The Frownlow Medal Wife Beaters Club after pleading guilty to savagely assaulting his ex-partner.

The Frownlow Medal Wife Beaters Club comprises footballers who have been found guilty of violence against women, and have been nominated for The Frownlow Medal or The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame.

Every member is given a Wife Beater Tattoo to remind them of their mistreatment of women.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL star Jarryd Hayne is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

The club contains winners of The Frownlow Medal, including Jarryd Hayne and Elijah Taylor. Hayne won the medal in 2021 after being found guilty of sexual assault and sent to prison, while Taylor was found guilty of domestic violence and kicked out of the AFL.

Romelo pleaded guilty to attacking his ex-girlfriend in 2019. The court heard that he broke her eye socket during a violent attack, and ripped chunks from her hair, as well as punching and choking her until she almost lost consciousness, because she refused to give him the passcode to her phone.

Many footballers have also been inducted into The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame as a result of their crimes. Nick Stevens served time behind bars for viciously assaulting his former partner, and Craig Wells was also imprisoned for drugging and raping a teenage girl, after he had played for the Wallabies. Other members of this not-so-exclusive club are still playing in their respective codes, are still winning premierships, are still being selected in representative teams and are still being praised as role models to young people.

The Frownlow Medal Wife Beaters Club:

NRL

Kenny Edwards

Zane Tetevano

Ben Barba

Jake Friend

Anthony Watts

Isaac Gordon

Richie Fa’aoso

Anthony Cherrington

Addin Fonua-Blake

Kirisome Auva’a

Jarryd Hayne

Jamil Hopoate

AFL

Elijah Taylor

Nick Stevens

Liam Jurrah

Rugby Union

Craig Wells

Image: NuNa

The Frownlow Medal Wife Beaters Club.

The Frownlow Medal Wife Beaters Club comprises footballers who have been found guilty of violence against women, and have been nominated for The Frownlow Medal or The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame.

Every member is given a Wife Beater Tattoo to remind them of their mistreatment of women.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL star Jarryd Hayne is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

The club contains winners of The Frownlow Medal, including Jarryd Hayne and Elijah Taylor. Hayne won the medal in 2021 after being found guilty of sexual assault and sent to prison, while Taylor was found guilty of domestic violence and kicked out of the AFL.

Many footballers have also been inducted into The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame as a result of their crimes. Nick Stevens served time behind bars for viciously assaulting his former partner, and Craig Wells was also imprisoned for drugging and raping a teenage girl, after he had played for the Wallabies. Other members of this not-so-exclusive club are still playing in their respective codes, are still winning premierships, are still being selected in representative teams and are still being praised as role models to young people.

The Frownlow Medal Wife Beaters Club:

NRL

Kenny Edwards

Zane Tetevano

Ben Barba

Jake Friend

Anthony Watts

Isaac Gordon

Richie Fa’aoso

Anthony Cherrington

Addin Fonua-Blake

Kirisome Auva’a

Greg Inglis

Ken McGuinness

Jarryd Hayne

Blake Ferguson

Jamil Hopoate

AFL

Elijah Taylor

Nick Stevens

Rugby Union

Craig Wells,

Image: NuNa

Jarryd Hayne wins The Frownlow Medal in 2021.

Former NRL player Jarryd Hayne has won The Frownlow Medal in 2021 after being sent to prison for sexually assaulting a woman on NRL Grand Final night in 2018. Hayne saw off the challenge of more than 70 professional footballers to win this year’s medal and is the sixth NRL player to receive the honour.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor was the 2020 recipient.

The former NSW and Australia star was found guilty of raping the woman at her home on the NSW Central Coast, and apparently asked a taxi driver to wait for him while he committed the crime. He was eventually sentenced this year after a lengthy legal process.

Unfortunately for Hayne, he was not able to attend the awards night for The Frownlow Medal and The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame, and he had to accept a replica of the award in the TV room at Cooma Correctional Centre. The replica was made by a fellow inmate out of Play-doh and had to be returned to guards immediately. He will receive the real medal once he is released.

Hayne saw off the challenges of two other NRL players who were accused of the same crime. Rookie Tristan Sailor is yet to have his day in court, and fellow Dragons player Jack de Belin was eventually found not guilty of an incident which occurred in Wollongong. De Belin was also nominated this year for breaching COVID-19 rules to attend Paul Vaughan‘s infamous house party, which earned nominations for 10 other players and created the Matt Dufty Fun Run.

Herstory is made

Nita Maynard became the first woman to be nominated for The Frownlow Medal since the award’s inception in 2015. The NRLW player got into a scuffle with bouncers at Northies after a few too many drinks, and paved the way for Millie Boyle and Deni Varnhagen. Boyle was caught in a toilet tryst with fellow rugby league player and multiple nominee Adam Elliott, while Varnhagen was delisted by the Adelaide Crows AFL club for refusing the COVID-19 vaccine.

Frownlow favourites

Jordan de Goey of Collingwood returned for more Frownlow fun, this time earning three nominations in the same year. He edged out 2016 medallist Corey Norman with two nominations, one of which was for a street fight outside Northies alongside his buddy James Segeyaro. Josh Dugan also earned two nominations, and said goodbye to the NRL after doing very little for the Cronulla Sharks all season.

An ugly trend

Yet again footballers were nominated for alleged violence against women. NRL players Tui Kamikamica, Jamil Hopoate and Anthony Milford were all accused of alleged incidents of violence against women, and are set to face court in 2022.

The bizarre

Footballers always provide so much off-field entertainment, and 2021 was no different. NRL player Lachlan Lewis was nominated for stealing club-owned speakers from his COVID-19 hub and trying to sell them online, while Roosters enforcer Victor Radley was fined for tackling someone – no joke. Tom Starling of the Raiders, meanwhile, earned his second nomination in two years, for exactly the same offence, at exactly the same bar, at exactly the same time of year.

Three clubs were nominated this year. Collingwood FC AFL club for services to racism, and NRL clubs Canterbury Bulldogs for COVID-19 breaches, as well as the Penrith Panthers, who destroyed the Summons – Provan trophy while celebrating their Grand Final victory.

NRL players clearly dominated again in 2021. Not one A-League footballer was nominated, only four Super Rugby players were eligible, and the only other significant incident involving an AFL player was Taylor Walker‘s racism and his cringeworthy apology video.

Footballers then partied the night away after the award announcement, while poor Jarryd was sent back to his cell.

Image: Dan Pelad

Northies wins major honour.

Northies Cronulla Hotel has been chosen to host the 2021 awards night for The Frownlow Medal and The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame after so many scandalous incidents occurred at the venue.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Northies helped make history this year. It is where NRLW player Nita Maynard became the first woman ever to be nominated for Frownlow honours when she had a few too many and got into a scuffle with bouncers. It is also where former NRL player James Segeyaro paired up with 2016 Frownlow medallist Corey Norman for a street fight against a group of random men.

In addition, Ben Barba was caught snorting cocaine at the club after the Cronulla Sharks grand final win in 2016, and this was one of the many offences which eventually helped him to win the medal in 2019.

“Northies is enormously proud to host the awards night for The Fronwlow Medal and The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame,” said a spokesperson for the club.

“We take enormous pride in creating the conditions for off-field shenanigans, and we believe we deserve to host the most prestigious event in Australian sport. It’s also great to have so many people partying in our club after all of the COVID-19 lockdowns.”

Organisers have promised a never-ending supply of alcohol and illicit drugs, as well as a bevy of innocent women to harass, objectify and demean. Smart phones will be banned in order to prevent any images from leaking to the press, but locked devices will be offered for players desperate to gamble their salaries away. Vaccination certificates will certainly not be checked.

Players can visit the Bromance Booth to kiss and make up with their team mates after an alcohol-fuelled fight, or slip into toilet cubicles with names such as Adam Elliott, Millie Boyle and Sonny Bill. A secure cage will also be placed in the middle of the sports bar for Jarryd Hayne, who has been granted three days parole in order to attend the celebrations.

Every Frownlow nominee has been invited to The Shire, but NRL and AFL players will once gain dominate the evening, at which The Fronwlow Medallist and the inductees into The Fronwlow Medal Hall of Fame will be announced. Of course, it wouldn’t be a footballing celebration without a nudie run for the players who failed to score a try in 2021.

Northies is also the local of Prime Minster Scott Morrison, who paid the fines of various NRL players when they were punished for breaching COIVD-19 biosecurity protocols. Morrison dipped into his own pocket for players such as Sharks back Josh Dugan, because the PM accepted responsibility for the slow national vaccine rollout which necessitated the NRL COVID-19 bubbles. Morrison has also promised to attend the awards night as long as he can be photographed drinking beer with sports stars and pretending to support the Sharks.

Northies will subsequently be closed for two days after the awards night, to allow players to be smuggled out of the premises unseen, and to allow for a very through deep clean.

Image: NuNa

New threat forces changes to NRL Dally M awards.

A looming threat forced the NRL to make unpopular changes to the Dally M awards night in 2021 – and it wasn’t the AFL. The NRL altered the traditional format of its awards presentation in response to the growing popularity of The Frownlow Medal celebration.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Rugby League fans slammed the new format which saw the awards stretched over two separate nights a week apart. The first instalment returned poor television ratings and attracted widespread criticism across social media. Experts suspected the downfall could be blamed on the timing of the AFL Brownlow Medal ceremony, but realised that it was the Frownlow award which was stealing the thunder.

“Every player wants to go to the awards night for The Frownlow Medal,” revealed NRL boss Andrew Abdo.

“It is a huge night of massive partying with no rules or restrictions with players from across NRL, AFL, Super Rugby and the A-League. Players get unlimited drugs, booze, women, music, sports gambling and no pesky journalists. No player can resist this, and it’s no wonder that party is more popular than the Dally Ms.”

Players have been displaying less interest in the Dally M night since the Frownlow Medal was introduced in 2015. In response, the NRL decided to experiment with a new format in order to win back players and fans.

“The Dally M used to be the most prestigious award in the NRL, but now it’s the Frownlow,” conceded Abdo.

“Just look at the number of NRL players who get nominated every year, and the fact that every medallist, except for 2020, has been an NRL player.”

The awards night for The Fronwlow Medal and The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame will be held later this year. The potential venues include Northies, Jarryd Hayne’s Hillsong Church, Paul Vaughan’s house or the restaurant in which Adam Elliott and Millie Boyle enjoyed their toilet tryst.

Image: NuNa