Controversial new rule could harm NRL and AFL teams.

The sudden introduction of a new rule could potentially leave some AFL and NRL teams unable to field a team in the coming weeks, and it has nothing to do with COVID-19.

The rule will require every AFL and NRL team to field at least one player who has been nominated for The Fronwlow Medal or The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame. Without a Frownlow nominee, teams will have to forfeit.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL star Jarryd Hayne is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

“We have supplied many, many nominees for The Fronwlow Medal and The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame since the award’s inception in 2015,” began a joint statement from the codes.

“Every winner of the medal has played NRL or AFL, and this rule change recognises that contribution and plays tribute to the countless players who have committed off-field scandals and remained in their teams, as well as the players who will surely commit another scandal this season – maybe even tomorrow.”

Not every club is happy with the sudden rule change. While every team in both codes is likely to have at least one nominee on their roster, injuries and COVID-19 illness could force some of them to miss games and force the team to forfeit, losing valuable competition points.

Clubs are also concerned about the reaction of sponsors, but they were reminded that most sponsors happily ignore off-field scandals if they know the sponsorship brings them PR or profit.

“Half our teams are sponsored by gambling companies, and half the players get nominated due to gambling, so sponsors needn’t worry,” explained administrators, before adding:

“Our various stand-alone rounds recognise sectors of the community. Pride round honours the LGBT+ community, Women’s round honours women and Indigenous round honours first nations people. This rule allows us to honour the behaviour of our players over the years, and the ability of many of them to get away with it.”

The rule was developed in consultation with the judges of The Fronwlow Medal, and for this reason it excluded players from Super Rugby and the A League. Super Rugby players receive few nominations, and for some reason, A League players almost none.

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Rhys Nicholls can bet on himself.

AFL player Rhys Nicholls is free to bet on himself to win The Fronwlow Medal in 2022 despite being punished for gambling on AFL games.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL star Jarryd Hayne is the most recent recipient.

Nicholls was recently given a $5000 and a two-match suspension after he was caught placing bets on games in which his Gold Coast Suns were playing in 2021. The best were placed from a gambling account in his name. Nicholls did not play in the games under question, but was punished according to AFL rules. Luckily for Nicholls, no such rules exist in The Frownlow Medal, so he can place as many bets on himself as he likes.

Nicholls has been fined and suspended, and forever damaged his reputation, all for bets totalling only $256, and all of which were unsuccessful. Will he have more luck betting on himself to win The Fronwlow Medal this year?

Image: NuNa


 

 

 

Andrew Lovett earns a Wife Beater Tattoo.

Former AFL player Andrew Lovett has earned a Wife Beater Tattoo from The Fronwlow Medal after pleading guilty to violence against women.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL star Jarryd Hayne is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Lovett pleaded guilty to the assault which occurred in 2011 on the Mornington Peninsula, Victoria. The court heard that the woman had taken Lovett in when he was homeless, and that the assault started after Lovett discovered the woman had told someone that he sold his medals to fund his alcohol and gambling addictions. One of the medals was from the Anzac Day game in 2005.

Lovett then reportedly smashed the woman’s phone before grabbing the victim by the throat and throwing her to the ground numerous times. He also held her down on the couch, while her baby slept nearby. The woman was left with neck and chest injuries, while Lovett was given a $2500 fine and escaped prison time.

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Ben Barba is a great ambassador.

Ben Barba is so committed to his role as ambassador for The Frownlow Medal that he had himself thrown in jail for alleged assault. The 2019 medallist is accused of assaulting his brother-in-law recently and was nominated for The Fronwlow Medal Hall of Fame.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Barba was remanded in custody and will spend time in jail for the alleged assault after being refused bail in Mackay, Queensland. The 2012 Dally M medallist was earlier arrested for allegedly assaulting his partner, and the mother of his four children, with whom he separated six months ago. Barba was also accused of assaulting Currie in 2019, and this is one of the charges which cost him his contract with the North Queensland Cowboys, and his NRL career.

Barba talked about the prestige of winning The Frownlow Medal in 2019 and promised to do everything he could to honour the award and protect its reputation. He has done exactly that in the intervening years, including this latest incident.

The current charges against the former premiership winner include assault occasioning bodily harm, and he was refused bail because the judge decided he is at risk of reoffending.

The former NRL star has a long history of off-field incidents.

In 2009, he got into a drunken fight with Canterbury teammates Jamal Idris and Lee Te Maari in Wentowrthville and was dropped to reserve grade. Then in 2013 he was stood down by the Bulldogs for behavioural reasons and checked into rehab for gambling and alcohol problems. The same year, he was accused, and later cleared, of assaulting Currie.

After starring in the grand final win for the Sharks in 2016, he tested positive to cocaine and lost his contract, before heading to Thailand for rehab. He then signed with the Cowboys in 2019, only to lose the contract after being charged with assault yet again.

Barba will be a guest of honour at the Frownlow awards night later this year, and everyone has been told to keep their female partners well away from him.

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Dayne Beams does more damage to his personal brand.

As if drug and gambling addictions weren’t enough, former AFL player Dayne Beams will appear on a reality TV show in order to completely destroy his reputation. Beams follows the familiar path of brilliant professional footballer, to drug, gambling and tattoo addict, to contestant on a reality TV show, and nominee for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Beams will further destory his personal reputation when he appears on Celebrity Big Brother, just as fellow AFL player Heath Shaw appeared on SAS Australia with disgraced NRL star Sam Burgess. In promotions for the show, Beams reveals a drug and gambling addiction.

Beams recently conceded that addiction to gambling and painkillers forced him to retire from the AFL, despite having two seasons remaining on his contract with the Collingwood Magpies. His admission followed the well-worn path of professional footballer admitting to a drug and gambling addiction caused by mental health issues, and winning praise for his bravery by a compliant mainstream sporting media.

The only difference in the case of Beams is that his father passed away in 2018 and left the midfielder shattered and distraught, and questioning his desire to play professional football.

The best way for Beams and other footballers to overcome mental health issues and deal with severe grief is, apparently, to appear on a reality TV show alongside other C-grade celebrities.

Beams will do his very best to scheme, lie, cheat, deceive and backstab in an attempt to win Celebrity Big Brother, and should use the same tactics to earn induction into The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame.

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Ethan Lowe to return to the NRL.

Former NRL player Ethan Lowe is set to return to TV screens during sports matches as the face of a sports betting company. Lowe is currently in negotiations with various companies who have not forgotten his role in a betting scandal involving NRL games.

Lowe was one of five players stood down for two matches in 2017 for gambling on games involving their clubs but which they did not play, and this has earned him a nomination for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

The former Queensland Origin player joins a host of former footballers who endorse one of the millions of gambling companies which swamp sports telecasts with their advertisements. Lowe was not able to land a gig as a commentator on TV or radio when he hung up the boots, so he chose the only other post-football career path and made himself available to a gambling company.

Betting companies are apparently interested in using him as an ambassador because he proved that he would do anything to place a bet, even gambling on games involving his own team, and even threatening his own career by breaching NRL betting rules.

“That’s commitment to the punt,” one company remarked.

“We want all of our clients and potential clients to have that same commitment. Forget about your bills, forget about your partners, forget about your kids and forget about your savings, just get on the punt. Bet on NRL, AFL, any footy code, any sport, just get on it. Bet on your phone, on your computer. Do it at home, at work, at the game, anywhere, anytime – but always remember to gamble responsibly.”

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Slade Griffin asks Harry Potter to propel him into The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame.

NRL player Slade Griffin has enlisted the help of everyone’s favourite magician, Harry Potter, to cast a spell on judges and ensure that he is inducted into The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame. Griffin, whose name sounds like it has been lifted directly from the pages of the popular novel, earned his nomination after being found guilty of betting on NRL games.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015 and AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Griffin apparently tried to cast a spell on the judges himself, but without the power of the chosen one, his spell proved ineffectual. As a result, he asked Harry to cast the spell, and in return, Griffin promised Harry that his portrait in the hall of fame will come to life when people walk past it, just like the ones at Hogwarts.

Griffin will find out later in the year if the spell has been successful.

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Do you know Cody Nelson?

Former NRL player Cody Nelson is not a household name. He never reached great heights on the field, and will be remembered more for gambling on NRL games and earning a nomination for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame.

Nelson received a two-match suspension from the NRL in 2014 after being found guilty of placing bets on NRL games. He was one of a number of players to be found guilty of the offence in the same period.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015 and AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Nelson rubbed shoulers with some of the greats of the game during his playing career, and he will be reunited with some of the biggest names in football when he attends the awards night for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame later this year.

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Ever wanted to punch your boss?

Rod Owen felt like punching his boss, so one day the former AFL player did just that and in the process earned himself a nomination for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

The man known as ‘Rocket’ got so fed up one day that he lashed out at his boss. The punch broke the boss’ nose and jaw so badly that his face had to be surgically reconstructed with microplates and titanium screws. Owen was sentenced to 18 months in Dhurringile prison farm, and served nine months.

What was discovered only recently was that the boss provoked the hiding with a joke about paedophilia, and that Owen himself was molested as a child. He was abused by a man named Darrell Ray, who was his primary school librarian and sports coach. He was also abused by Albert Briggs, who was an official at the St Kilda club where Rod played as a child and an adult. Owen revealed that Briggs molested him in the change rooms before junior Grand Final at the MCG. Briggs left the club a hero, Owen eventually left in disgrace.

The abuse as a child traumatised Owen for years, and provoked drug, gambling and alcohol addiction.  At just 23 years of age, he’d accrued a $150,000 gambling debt and his alcohol and drug benders could last for weeks. He is remembered for 63-day bender, after which a teammate found him lying unconscious and bloodied in a gutter outside the Portsea pub. He was also caught drunkenly driving at 150 kilometres per hour down the Nepean Highway.

The highly-talented athlete also paid $30,000 in compensation in 2004 to a woman who complained that he had assaulted her outside a Melbourne hotel.

Owen’s story mirrors that of rugby union star Tony Daly, whose life spiralled into drug and alcohol addiction, and crime, in response to abuse he suffered as a child at boarding school. Both players have taken legal action against their respective schools.

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Hymel Hunt follows his cousins to a nomination for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame.

Hymel Hunt has been nominated for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame for betting on NRL matches, and in doing so joined two of his cousins who have won Frownlow honours.

Hunt was suspended for two matches by the NRL in 2014 after being found guilty of betting on NRL games, and his nomination sees him join cousins Kirisome Auva’a and 2018 Frownlow medallist Karmichael Hunt in the Frownlow family.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015 and AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Hunt will be hoping that his suspension is enough to earn him a place in The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame, especially if it gives him bragging rights at the next family BBQ.

To find out about the actions that earned Auva’a and Karmichael their Frownlow honours, go to http://www.instagram.com/thefrownlowmedal.

Image: NuNa