Dayne Beams does more damage to his personal brand.

As if drug and gambling addictions weren’t enough, former AFL player Dayne Beams will appear on a reality TV show in order to completely destroy his reputation. Beams follows the familiar path of brilliant professional footballer, to drug, gambling and tattoo addict, to contestant on a reality TV show, and nominee for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Beams will further destory his personal reputation when he appears on Celebrity Big Brother, just as fellow AFL player Heath Shaw appeared on SAS Australia with disgraced NRL star Sam Burgess. In promotions for the show, Beams reveals a drug and gambling addiction.

Beams recently conceded that addiction to gambling and painkillers forced him to retire from the AFL, despite having two seasons remaining on his contract with the Collingwood Magpies. His admission followed the well-worn path of professional footballer admitting to a drug and gambling addiction caused by mental health issues, and winning praise for his bravery by a compliant mainstream sporting media.

The only difference in the case of Beams is that his father passed away in 2018 and left the midfielder shattered and distraught, and questioning his desire to play professional football.

The best way for Beams and other footballers to overcome mental health issues and deal with severe grief is, apparently, to appear on a reality TV show alongside other C-grade celebrities.

Beams will do his very best to scheme, lie, cheat, deceive and backstab in an attempt to win Celebrity Big Brother, and should use the same tactics to earn induction into The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame.

Image: NuNa

Ethan Lowe to return to the NRL.

Former NRL player Ethan Lowe is set to return to TV screens during sports matches as the face of a sports betting company. Lowe is currently in negotiations with various companies who have not forgotten his role in a betting scandal involving NRL games.

Lowe was one of five players stood down for two matches in 2017 for gambling on games involving their clubs but which they did not play, and this has earned him a nomination for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

The former Queensland Origin player joins a host of former footballers who endorse one of the millions of gambling companies which swamp sports telecasts with their advertisements. Lowe was not able to land a gig as a commentator on TV or radio when he hung up the boots, so he chose the only other post-football career path and made himself available to a gambling company.

Betting companies are apparently interested in using him as an ambassador because he proved that he would do anything to place a bet, even gambling on games involving his own team, and even threatening his own career by breaching NRL betting rules.

“That’s commitment to the punt,” one company remarked.

“We want all of our clients and potential clients to have that same commitment. Forget about your bills, forget about your partners, forget about your kids and forget about your savings, just get on the punt. Bet on NRL, AFL, any footy code, any sport, just get on it. Bet on your phone, on your computer. Do it at home, at work, at the game, anywhere, anytime – but always remember to gamble responsibly.”

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Slade Griffin asks Harry Potter to propel him into The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame.

NRL player Slade Griffin has enlisted the help of everyone’s favourite magician, Harry Potter, to cast a spell on judges and ensure that he is inducted into The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame. Griffin, whose name sounds like it has been lifted directly from the pages of the popular novel, earned his nomination after being found guilty of betting on NRL games.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015 and AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Griffin apparently tried to cast a spell on the judges himself, but without the power of the chosen one, his spell proved ineffectual. As a result, he asked Harry to cast the spell, and in return, Griffin promised Harry that his portrait in the hall of fame will come to life when people walk past it, just like the ones at Hogwarts.

Griffin will find out later in the year if the spell has been successful.

Image: NuNa

Do you know Cody Nelson?

Former NRL player Cody Nelson is not a household name. He never reached great heights on the field, and will be remembered more for gambling on NRL games and earning a nomination for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame.

Nelson received a two-match suspension from the NRL in 2014 after being found guilty of placing bets on NRL games. He was one of a number of players to be found guilty of the offence in the same period.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015 and AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Nelson rubbed shoulers with some of the greats of the game during his playing career, and he will be reunited with some of the biggest names in football when he attends the awards night for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame later this year.

Image: NuNa

Ever wanted to punch your boss?

Rod Owen felt like punching his boss, so one day the former AFL player did just that and in the process earned himself a nomination for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

The man known as ‘Rocket’ got so fed up one day that he lashed out at his boss. The punch broke the boss’ nose and jaw so badly that his face had to be surgically reconstructed with microplates and titanium screws. Owen was sentenced to 18 months in Dhurringile prison farm, and served nine months.

What was discovered only recently was that the boss provoked the hiding with a joke about paedophilia, and that Owen himself was molested as a child. He was abused by a man named Darrell Ray, who was his primary school librarian and sports coach. He was also abused by Albert Briggs, who was an official at the St Kilda club where Rod played as a child and an adult. Owen revealed that Briggs molested him in the change rooms before junior Grand Final at the MCG. Briggs left the club a hero, Owen eventually left in disgrace.

The abuse as a child traumatised Owen for years, and provoked drug, gambling and alcohol addiction.  At just 23 years of age, he’d accrued a $150,000 gambling debt and his alcohol and drug benders could last for weeks. He is remembered for 63-day bender, after which a teammate found him lying unconscious and bloodied in a gutter outside the Portsea pub. He was also caught drunkenly driving at 150 kilometres per hour down the Nepean Highway.

The highly-talented athlete also paid $30,000 in compensation in 2004 to a woman who complained that he had assaulted her outside a Melbourne hotel.

Owen’s story mirrors that of rugby union star Tony Daly, whose life spiralled into drug and alcohol addiction, and crime, in response to abuse he suffered as a child at boarding school. Both players have taken legal action against their respective schools.

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Hymel Hunt follows his cousins to a nomination for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame.

Hymel Hunt has been nominated for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame for betting on NRL matches, and in doing so joined two of his cousins who have won Frownlow honours.

Hunt was suspended for two matches by the NRL in 2014 after being found guilty of betting on NRL games, and his nomination sees him join cousins Kirisome Auva’a and 2018 Frownlow medallist Karmichael Hunt in the Frownlow family.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015 and AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Hunt will be hoping that his suspension is enough to earn him a place in The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame, especially if it gives him bragging rights at the next family BBQ.

To find out about the actions that earned Auva’a and Karmichael their Frownlow honours, go to http://www.instagram.com/thefrownlowmedal.

Image: NuNa

Don’t Bet Against the Wolfman.

Ignore the poor odds against David Williams securing a place in The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame. The Wolfman stands a chance. The former NRL player received his nomination for betting on rugby league games in 2014, for which he was banned from the NRL for a portion of the season.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015 and AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Williams may not have spent time in prison, pooed in someone’s shoe or beaten his wife, but he may still find a place in the Hall of Fame alongside players who have. Anything can happen in the world of gambling and Williams created a career as a winger by scoring tries and stopping them when the odds seemed to be stacked against him.

What’s more, the judges of The Frownlow Medal would be very excited at the prospect of installing a plaque which reads “WOLFMAN”.

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Heath Shaw is a triple threat to The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame.

Former AFL player Heath Shaw has been nominated for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame for drink driving, gambling and drunken behaviour.

Shaw crashed into a parked car while driving drunk and then lied about the incident to the media. He was also suspended from AFL for gambling on matches and detained by police for drunken behaviour in public.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015 and AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Shaw’s strongest claim for a place in the Hall of Fame was made while playing for Collingwood. He smashed into a car while driving drunk, then denied to the media that fellow Magpie Alan Didak was a passenger in the car. Both players had to confess when video footage proved conclusive.

Shaw made a second bid for the Frownlow when he was found guilty of having a friend place a bet on an AFL game, for which he was fined $20,000 and suspended from the competition.

In a last ditch attempt to earn a place on the wall beside some of Australia’s greatest footballers, he had himself detained by police for drunken behaviour on the morning of the 2014 AFL Grand Final. For this action, he can’t blame the fact that he was a Magpie, because he was playing for GWS Giants.

Has Shaw done enough to be inducted into The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame?

Find out later this year.

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Why Buddy and Dusty met with Eddie Hayson.

AFL players Dustin Martin and Lance Buddy Franklin have revealed that they met with notorious Sydney identity Eddie Hayson because they were desperate to earn nominations for The Frownlow Medal.

The sporting champions were spotted at a restaurant with the infamous Hayson and the media went into a frenzy attempting to explain the meeting. The players finally revealed that they were making a last ditch effort to secure nominations for the most prestigious prize in Australian sport.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL player Ben Barba is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

The AFL legends were seen with the notorious gambling figure and former brothel owner who has been the subject of police inquiries in the past and was suspected of using inside information provided by NRL players to gamble on matches.

Franklin and Martin have both been nominated for Frownlow honours in the past, and were keen to remind the rookies that they’re still a threat on and off the feild.

Franklin actually achieves the rare honour of being nominated for The Frownlow Medal and The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame, in the same year. He earned his hall of fame nomination for reportedly verbally abusing and physically intimidating a woman at a bar in Melbourne and for defending his actions on Twitter. He then got drunk and embarrassed himself at the F1 Grand Prix in Melbourne in 2013, and crashed into a row of parked cars in the exclusive Sydney suburb of Rose Bay in 2014.

Dusty, meanwhile, has an even more colourful record. The Richmond legend was nominated for The Frownlow Medal in 2016 for threatening to stab a woman in the eye with chopsticks, making a handcuff gesture to fans, giving the two finger salute to fans, missing training after mixing prescription drugs with alcohol, and for driving while suspended.

The Frownlow Medal would cap off a great season for Martin, who won the premiership with Richmond and the Norm Smith medal, and it would redeem a disappointing year for Franklin who struggled with injury and watched his Sydney Swans finish near the bottom of the ladder.

The sporting heroes will find out in a matter of weeks if they’ve done enough to win the greatest prize in Australian sport. They’ve been assured they can invite Hayson to the award’s night, because attendees will be in need of some company.

Image: NuNa

Jaidyn Stephenson firms as favourite for The Frownlow Medal.

Punters are placing huge bets on Jaidyn Stephenson to win The Frownlow Medal after the AFL player earned the harshest punishment of any footballer this year.

Stephenson was banned for 10 matches after it was discovered he had bet on AFL games, and he will miss the remainder of the home and away season. The Collingwood player apparently bet on three games in which he was playing, and was also fined $20,000.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015 and code-swapper Karmichael Hunt was the most recent recipient.

Stephenson’s punishment is more severe than any other Frownlow nominee in 2019. The previous favourite, NRL player Scott Bolton, was stood down for only five games after pleading guilty to assaulting a woman in a nightclub, while a host of other players were given shorter bans, or fines, for a vast range of scandals.

Former Cowboys player Ben Barba was banished from the NRL earlier this year, but was never actually found guilty of assaulting his partner, and fellow NRL player Dylan Walker was found not guilty of assaulting his partner.

Of course, Stephenson must still await the outcome of the court cases involving Rugby League players Jarryd Hayne and Jack de Belin, who were charged with allegedly sexually assaulting women. Now that Stephenson has some time on his hands, perhaps he will offer his services to the legal representatives of both of these players to ensure they are found not guilty.

According to news reports, none of the bets that Stephenson placed were successful. Let’s hope he has more luck with The Frownlow Medal.

Image: NuNa