An open letter to Jordan de Goey.

Dear Jordan,

We are listening. Everyone at The Frownlow Medal is acutely aware of your unquenchable desire to win the most prestigious award in Australian sport. Your concerted efforts since 2017 are admirable and your perseverance is what makes you a wonderful role model to young Australians.

Never give up. Never lose hope. The Frownlow Medal is within your reach.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

Jordan, we were there when you earned your first nomination in 2017, and we recognise your latest efforts, which have earned you three nominations in 2021 alone. We followed your exploits when you were recently fined $2075 for road offences including speeding while driving as a P-plater and sending text messages while stopped at traffic lights. When you were caught driving a black Maserati GranCabrio at 93km/h in an 80km/h zone last year, without displaying your P Plates.

Everyone at the Frownlow family, and many members of the public, understand that many professional footballers are just oversized teenagers, and that forgetting to display your P Plates is an honest mistake, and that you were just dropping off the expensive sports car to someone else.

We were there, following closely, when you had an indecent assault charge withdrawn by police prosecutors earlier in 2021.

Also, many teenagers have their licences suspended, and claim they have no idea it had been suspended. After all, they’re just teenagers. It’s also understandable that you would make exactly the same mistake while riding a motorcycle.

Your hard work in 2018 is also acknowledged. We followed your story when you were caught drink-driving while on your P plates, and there’s nothing wrong with being stuck on your P plates throughout your adult life. We supported you through that suspension, and through the suspension when you lied about how you hurt your hand in 2017. You claimed your dog hurt your hand, made your coach lie about the story to the media, and then conceded that it happened while you were partying and fighting at a St Kilda nightclub.

All teenagers tell little white lies.

Jordan, it’s fine. Everyone blames their dog for something, just like school children blame their dog for eating their homework. We’re with you, we support you, and we applaud the AFL and the Magpies for offering you support and wellbeing every time you earn yet another nomination for The Frownlow Medal.

Jordan, in closing, we would also like to stress, in the strongest possible terms, that your efforts have not been wasted. You have never won the medal, despite being in the running in 2017, 2018, 2020 and 2021, but you must understand the extremely high calibre of nominees and medallists. The standard is particularly high this year, as one of the leading candidates is in prison for sexual assault. Yes, it’s difficult, but don’t give up. You have the talent, the attitude, the mindset and the credentials to one day be The Frownlow Medallist.

Jordan, you know there are no guarantees in sport. You are, however, still in a great position to one day win The Frownlow Medal. Keep up the good work.

The Frownlow Family

Image: NuNa

John and Jamil Hopoate join the Frownlow family.

Former NRL players Jamil and John Hopoate have become the latest father and son duo to be nominated for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame. Jamil was recently nominated for leading police on a car chase related to alleged drug importation and was nominated for both The Frownlow Medal and the hall of fame in the same year, while father John is the owner of the most famous finger in rugby league.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Jamil allegedly got into a truck containing $155 million worth of cocaine, and sped through the streets of Sydney with the police in pursuit. He then allegedly jumped from the truck, dumped a backpack also containing cocaine and sprinted away from police in the suburb of Pagewood. He was eventually caught before he could ground the ball with downward pressure in the in-goal area.

Young Hopoate will now most likely spend time in prison, for the second time. He was sentenced to 18 months in 2014 after being found guilty of a violent assault outside a Manly pub, while he was playing for the Sea Eagles. He and two friends brutally bashed two men and hit and kicked them while they were on the ground. Jamil also argued with security guards and fled the scene, and later defended himself by saying he had self-medicated with alcohol to deal with stress and anxiety.

The back-rower was welcomed back into the NRL, where he most recently played for the Brisbane Broncos. He’s lost his contract with the Broncos even before he was charged with assaulting his partner in Port Macquarie in late 2020. Police allege Jamil hit his partner to the ground, spat at security guards, threatened to bash them and fled the scene, leaving behind the mother of his nine-month-old child. His partner was taken to hospital, and he was later caught drink-driving.

Father John was inducted into the hall of fame in 2016 after multiple nominations for offences such as playing rugby union under a false name, inserting his finger into a player’s private parts during a game, verbally abusing a touch judge and ball boy, and for numerous charges of assault.

John and Jamil now join the following father and son pairings who are already part of the Frownlow family:

Jim and Andrew Krakouer (AFL)

Gary Ablett Jr and Sr. (AFL)

Daniel and Roger Kerr (AFL)

Wendell and Tristan Sailor (NRL)

Image: NuNa

Has Jack Watts been nominated for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame?

Footy fans are confused. They thought former AFL player Jack Watts had earned a nomination for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame, but then reports indicated that he hadn’t. To add to the confusion, it’s the second time he has and hasn’t been nominated for Australian sport’s highest honour.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Watts was originally charged with a driving offence in Adelaide in 2020. He was accused of drink-driving, failing to stop at a crash scene, failing to give particulars about the crash to a police officer, and driving without due care. A warrant was issued for his arrest, but then things got complicated. Lawyers intervened, and reporters starting using words like ‘revoke’, ‘summons’, ‘serve’ and ‘hearing’. At present, it’s hard to say whether Watts has a legal case to answer or not, and whether he can receive a nomination for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame.

The former Melbourne and Port Adelaide player has confused Frownlow judges in the past. In February 2019, a video emerged of him snorting a white substance off the chest of a woman, but his management claimed the substance was legal.

Watts has apparently implored his lawyer to clear the legal confusion and make him eligible for a bona fide nomination for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame. Watts is desperate to attend the Frownlow awards night, where there is no doubt as to what footballers will be snorting off womens’ chests.

Image: NuNa

Jamil Hopoate earns a Wife Beater tattoo.

Former NRL player Jamil Hopoate has been awarded a Wife Beater Tattoo from The Frownlow Medal after pleading guilty to hitting his partner in December 2020.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Hopoate recently admitted to two charges of common assault which included hitting his partner to the ground with an open palm before allegedly getting in his car and driving away from a club in Port Macquarie. The former Manly and Brisbane player had already argued with and spat on security guards, and sped off after assaulting the mother of his nine-month-old child.

It is alleged that Hopoate’s partner asked him to leave the club’s poker room and go home but he threw his partner’s key card to the ground and was thrown out of the venue by security. He then threatened to bash the guards, and was later pulled over and charged with drink driving. Meanwhile, his partner was taken to hospital for treatment.

Hopoate joins a long list of professional footballers who have earned Wife Beater tattoos, including:

AFL

Nick Stevens

Justin Murphy

Liam Jurrah

Elijah Taylor (2020 Frownlow Medallist)

NRL

Robert Lui

Stuart Webb

Sam Burgess (premiership winner, England international)

Matt Lodge

Scott Bolton (premiership winner)

Kenny Edwards

Zane Tetevano (premiership winner, New Zealand international)

Ben Barba (premiership winner, Dally M medallist)

Jake Friend (premiership winning captain, Origin)

Anthony Watts

Isaac Gordon

Richie Fa’aoso (premiership winner, Tonga international)

Anthony Cherrington

Addin Fonua-Blake (Tonga international)

Kirisome Auva’a (premiership winner, Samoa international)

Greg Inglis (premiership winner, Origin winner, Australian captain – for a few hours)

Ken McGuinness (NSW Origin)

and Dylan Walker (premiership winner, Origin, Australia)

And let’s not forget Craig Wells, who was found guilty of raping a teenage girl after plying her with illicit drugs. A far cry from playing for the Wallabies.

Image: NuNa

Danny Jacobs and Lance Picioane need a lift to the Frownlow awards.

Can anyone give Danny Jacobs and Lance Picioane a lift to the awards night for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame? The former AFL players won’t be driving after involvement in a drink-driving incident, and they can’t afford an Uber after being hit with a $5000 fine.

Jacobs and Picioane would love to be at the night of nights with a host of other famous footballers, and could share the ride with some of the other players who were nominated for the same offence.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Jacobs registered a blood alcohol reading more than double the legal limit in 2004, and to make matters worse, he lied about the incident to Hawthorn Hawks officials. Jacobs apparently said he was just sitting in the driver’s seat listening to some tunes and waiting for a friend to drive him home from a nightclub, but it was later discovered that he had been driving and had made two illegal turns.

Police followed him and carried out the breath test which confirmed his guilt.

Picioane, meanwhile, is implicated in the scandal because he was ill and asked Jacobs to drive the car, even though he knew Jacobs was drunk.

Both players were fined and ordered to undertake drink-driving courses and community service, while Picioane was suspended for one game. Jacobs was not suspended because he was injured at the time.

What is most important now is getting the two former Hawks to the awards night for The Frownlow Medal and The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame, to be held later this year.

Image: NuNa

Name your child Corey.

Parents are being urged to name their new-born Corey after Corey Horsburgh became the fifth player with that name to be nominated for The Frownlow Medal. Horsburgh earned his nomination for low-range drink driving on the same day that a fellow Corey from the same club was nominated for the same offence.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

“Corey is trending,” explained judges of The Frownlow Medal.

“Horsburgh and Harawira-Naera from the Canberra Raiders are the latest players to be in contention for Frownlow honours this year, and they were both nominated for drink driving on the very same day. Their first name must have something to do with that.”

“Let’s not forget that the winner of the Frownlow in 2016 was Corey Norman, who won for all manner of off-field scandals and was recently nominated again for a brawl outside a pub. Then there’s Queensland Origin hero Corey Oates and fellow Bronco Cory Paix, who have been nominated in the past.”

“If you want your child to have a strong chance of winning the most coveted award in Australian sport, call them Corey.”

Judges also reminded parents that the precise spelling of the name is not important, and that Corey/Cory is an ideal name for a boy or a girl.

“All of the Coreys who have so far been nominated have been men, but female footballers from across the four codes are also eligible for the Frownlow, it’s just that none of them have ever done anything scandalous.”

The Canberra Coreys await sanctions from the Raiders and the NRL while they continue their pre-season training, and the Australian public waits to see if anyone named Corey will be good enough to win The Frownlow Medal in 2021.

Image: NuNa

Corey Harawira-Naera to teach schoolgirls about the dangers of drink driving.

NRL player Corey Harawira-Naera has been recruited to teach schoolgirls about road safety due to his intimate knowledge of road rules and schoolgirls. Harawira-Naera will present a series of one-on-one and small group tutorials to senior secondary girls throughout the country after he was recently caught drink driving.

Harawira-Naera returned a high-range alcohol reading when pulled over by police on Christmas Eve 2020, and earns his second nomination for The Frownlow Medal in as many years. The Kiwi international scored his first nomination when he was caught having sex with a schoolgirl in Port Macquarie while on a training camp with the Canterbury Bulldogs. He was initially kicked out of the NRL but was allowed to return when it was discovered that the girl’s grades had drastically improved.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The front-rower will participate in a self-drive tour of the country visiting designated girls secondary schools. It will be sponsored by a conglomerate of Australian breweries and will be heavily promoted through social media, because that is how Corey prefers to communicate with young women. The Raiders enforcer is said to be very excited about the lecture tour, and his prospects in 2021.

Harawira-Naera signed a contract with the Canberra Raiders for the second half of the 2020 season and apparently vowed to give up alcohol and put his scandalous past behind him. That promise didn’t last long.

“I was pretty devo about not winning the Frownlow last year because, you know, I got with a school girl and that’s a pretty bad look for the sport – but I still didn’t win,” he explained.

“I knew I was never gonna win the Frownlow if I stayed off the grog, so I got the boys together and got hammered, and because it was Christmas Eve I was pretty sure I’d be pulled over. Now I’ve started 2021 with a bang – got myself a nomination so it’s all cool – I’ll see what else I can do this year, it’s only February bro.”

The road safety tour will begin in Canberra in the middle of February, and is open to any schoolgirl over the age of consent.

Image: NuNa

Heath Shaw is a triple threat to The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame.

Former AFL player Heath Shaw has been nominated for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame for drink driving, gambling and drunken behaviour.

Shaw crashed into a parked car while driving drunk and then lied about the incident to the media. He was also suspended from AFL for gambling on matches and detained by police for drunken behaviour in public.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015 and AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Shaw’s strongest claim for a place in the Hall of Fame was made while playing for Collingwood. He smashed into a car while driving drunk, then denied to the media that fellow Magpie Alan Didak was a passenger in the car. Both players had to confess when video footage proved conclusive.

Shaw made a second bid for the Frownlow when he was found guilty of having a friend place a bet on an AFL game, for which he was fined $20,000 and suspended from the competition.

In a last ditch attempt to earn a place on the wall beside some of Australia’s greatest footballers, he had himself detained by police for drunken behaviour on the morning of the 2014 AFL Grand Final. For this action, he can’t blame the fact that he was a Magpie, because he was playing for GWS Giants.

Has Shaw done enough to be inducted into The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame?

Find out later this year.

Image:NuNa

Frank Farina’s foolish Frownlow folly.

Former Socceroo Frank Farina committed one off-field incident during his football career, but it was enough to earn him a nomination for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame. The coach and player of the national team was arrested for drink driving in 2009.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015 and AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

The drink driving charge saw Farina sacked as coach of the Brisbane Roar.

Farina must now wait until the end of the year to find out if he has done enough to earn himself a position in The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame, alongside players who have committed all manner of off-field indiscretions – all which are listed at www.instagram.com/thefrownlowmedal/

Image:NuNa

Jamil Hopoate starts 2021 with a bang.

NRL player Jamil Hopoate has already fulfilled a new year’s resolution after being nominated for The Frownlow Medal for alleged domestic violence and drink driving.

Hopoate was charged with three counts of common assault, two counts of stalk/intimidate intend fear physical harm and mid-range drink driving after an incident in Port Macquarie in late 2020.The Brisbane Broncos player has been granted conditional bail and will face court in late January.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

Hopoate continues a fine family tradition in The Frownlow Medal. His father John already sits in the Hall of Fame for his infamous finger incident, as well as numerous other off-field scandals during and after his career. Jamil himself spent time in prison after assaulting two men outside a pub in Sydney in 2014, for which he was sacked by the Manly Sea Eagles.

Jamil is currently off contract so The Frownlow Medal might be the only victory he celebrates this year. He can add the medal to the wooden spoon he won with the Broncos in 2021, and if he is found guilty of domestic violence, he will win the coveted Wife Beater tattoo.

Domestic violence charges and drink driving would normally earn a player favouritism for The Frownlow Medal, but not in 2021. Fellow NRL players Jack de Belin, Jarryd Hayne and Tristan Sailor have all been accused of sexual assault, while Manase Fainu faces charges of stabbing a man.

The fight for The Frownlow Medal in 2021 looks like being one of the toughest in history.

Image: NuNa