Chris Lewis’ teaching career is history.

NRL player Chris Lewis better hope the Melbourne Storm renew his contract in 2022 because his teaching career could be over.

Lewis taught high school History and English before being offered a full-time playing contract with the Storm, but his recent nomination for The Frownlow Medal puts his teaching career in doubt.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

Lewis earned his nomination for appearing in a leaked video in the presence of cocaine, alongside Storm teammates Cameron Munster and Brandon Smith, who were partying with other men after losing the qualifying final to the Panthers.

He was given a $4000 fine and suspended for one match, and told to write an essay outlining the dangers of drugs.

He may never be allowed to teach children again because being caught in the presence of cocaine on social media will make it very difficult for him to secure a Working With Children Check. Without a WWCC, Lewis cannot work as a teacher, or in any direct role with children.

If Lewis is allowed back in the classroom, his students can expect to given homework tasks such as:

  • NRL players are effective role models for young Australians. Do you agree? Why, why not?
  • Write 300 words on the causes of Cameron Munster’s trip to rehab.
  • Use the following vocabulary correctly in a sentence: Illicit, Integrity Commission, Suspension, Punishment, Cocaine, Leaked video, Scandal, Disrepute.
  • Write a report on all of the NRL players who have been caught in possession of illicit drugs.
  • One thing NRL players learn from History is that they never learn from History. Discuss.

Image: NuNa

Commiserate or celebrate: is there a difference?

Commiserating and celebrating seem to be the same thing for many NRL players, after three of the game’s biggest names were recently caught with cocaine. Reece Walsh, Brandon Smith and Cameron Munster have all been nominated for The Frownlow Medal after being caught with the white powder and charged by police.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

Walsh used the white powder to celebrate, Munster to commiserate, and Smith to do both. Walsh was partying at Surfer’s Paradise just moments after being named RLPA Rookie of the Year when he was caught in possession of cocaine.

Munster, meanwhile, was commiserating the Melbourne Storm semi-final loss at a party and was filmed in possession of the illicit drug. The same leaked video incriminated his teammate Brandon Smith, who was managing the mixed emotions of missing out on the grand final and being named Dally M Hooker of the year.

They say a professional football career can be an emotional rollercoaster, but the best way to manage the highs and lows seems to be with cocaine.

If nothing else, at least it guarantees Walsh, Munster and Smith a chance to win The Fronwlow Medal in 2021. If they succeed or fail in their quest to take home the greatest prize in Australian sport, they clearly know how to process the result.

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Cameron Munster enters Role Model Rehab.

NRL player Cameron Munster has entered Role Model Rehab after earning a nomination for The Fronwlow Medal for appearing in a leaked video in the presence of cocaine.

Munster follows a well-trodden path of footballing role models who have undertaken formal rehabilitation for abuse of drugs or alcohol, and he has promised to avoid consuming alcohol for 12 months. He has also promised to be a better role model.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

Munster appeared shirtless and dancing on a table beside a quantity of cocaine in the leaked video, alongside Storm teammates Brandon Smith and Chris Lewis, plus other men. Following negative press from the video, Munster was given a suspended $100,000 fine, suspended for one match and forced to attend rehab. He has also been told to avoid alcohol for a year.

The Queensland Origin star was also dropped from the Storm leadership group, which comprises fellow Frownlow nominees Jesse Bromwich (aka Captain Cocaine) and Christian Welch.

Munster told the media:

“I want the kids out there to know that my behaviour was not OK. I owe it to you to be a better role model, and I’ll strive to do that in future.”

Included in Munster’s punishment is a requirement to provide coaching and education for young men and women entering the elite sporting system, because he is such as great role model.

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Australian children to be vaccinated against footy players.

The Australian government has added a category to the COVID-19 vaccination program after Frank Winterstein, Ben Roberts and Roy Asotasi attended an illegal anti-lockdown march in Sydney recently.

The former NRL players earned nominations for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame after putting the safety of all Australian children at risk and potentially extending the very lockdown they were protesting against.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

“Footballers have always been a danger to children,” a statement from the federal government began.

“Australians have known this for a long time. Frownlow judges have known this for a long time. The actions of Misters Winterstein, Roberts and Asotasi have confirmed this fact.”

“As a result, a special vaccine is being developed which is proven to protect anyone under the age of 18 from the influence of footballers and former footballers. It is vital that we protect the next generation of Australians in this time of crisis and into the future.”

“Already this year there have been at least 50 nominations for The Frownlow Medal and many for the hall of fame. Jarryd Hayne is currently in prison for sexual assault and many other players have harmed society on their way to a nomination. Clearly, children needed stronger protection against footy players.”

It is believed the vaccine roll out will begin at some point this decade, and that children at exclusive private schools will receive the first vaccinations.

Winterstein is a famous anti-vaxer, as is his wife Taylor. She revealed via social media that police visited her house shortly after the protest and issued her and Frank with $1000 fines “for breaching public health orders after they left home without a reasonable excuse and attended the Sydney CBD protest”.

Even after police showed their badges, Taylor accused the police of trespassing on private property, and demanded they show more ‘evidence’.

Fortunately for Roberts, Asotasi and the Winterstein’s, players are not required to be vaccinated in order to attend the Frownlow awards night later this year, because attendees are likely to catch much more than COVID-19.

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Slade Griffin asks Harry Potter to propel him into The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame.

NRL player Slade Griffin has enlisted the help of everyone’s favourite magician, Harry Potter, to cast a spell on judges and ensure that he is inducted into The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame. Griffin, whose name sounds like it has been lifted directly from the pages of the popular novel, earned his nomination after being found guilty of betting on NRL games.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015 and AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Griffin apparently tried to cast a spell on the judges himself, but without the power of the chosen one, his spell proved ineffectual. As a result, he asked Harry to cast the spell, and in return, Griffin promised Harry that his portrait in the hall of fame will come to life when people walk past it, just like the ones at Hogwarts.

Griffin will find out later in the year if the spell has been successful.

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Fox hunting with a rabbit during COVID-19.

NRL players Josh Addo-Carr, Latrell Mitchell and Tyrone Roberts-Davis have been nominated for The Frownlow Medal after breaking coronavirus social distancing rules during a shooting and camping trip on Mitchell’s property in northern NSW.

Addo-Carr, nicknamed Fox, dobbed himself in when he posted a series of photos on his social media account which show the trio gathering with a large group, in clear violation of social distancing rules.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL player Ben Barba is the most recent recipient.

Addo-Carr and Mitchell are now the subject of a police investigation, after various photos showed the pair shooting, camping, riding on the beach and having a wonderful time in large groups. The NRL is also investigating as it tries to resume its competition in May, and will look into the actions of Roberts-Davis.

Mitchell apologised to the public via a video on social media, while Addo-Carr issued an apology. They defended their actions as a chance to get out of the city, relax and have fun for a weekend – something most of the world’s population would love to do right now, but are not allowed.

This is not the first time a trip to northern NSW has landed Mitchell in trouble. A night out with the boys at a pub near Taree turned ugly and earned the star player his first Frownlow nomination in 2019.

The three NRL players join AFL players Cameron Zurhaar and Nick Larkey in earning Frownlow nominations for breaking social distancing rules. The shooting party must now wait on the police investigation and the decision of the NRL to find out if they can play once the competition resumes. They will also be forced to attend the Frownlow awards ceremony via skype or zoom.

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A Big Man Takes a Big Swipe at a Big Prize.

He may well be the biggest man to have ever played in the NRL, and Neslon Asofa- Solomona may have swung himself into contention for the biggest prize in Australian sport, The Frownlow Medal.

The Melbourne Storm player was involved in a wild pub brawl in Bali while enjoying an end of season holiday with teammates. Video footage shows Big Nelson throwing wild punches as the brawl spills out into the street.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015 and code-swapper Karmichael Hunt was the most recent recipient.

Asofa-Solomona has been banned for three matches by the NRL Integrity Unit, and this may determine his fate in The Frownlow Medal. It also means he will miss the end of year Test Matches for New Zealand.

Ironically, the big fella was sin binned in the opening minutes of a finals match against the Roosters for what was essentially a light slap to the face of opposing prop Sio Siua Taukeiaho. It was a bit more than a light slap in Bali though.

One question that needs to be answered is just how drunk were the Australians who chose to pick a fight with Suliasi Vunivalu and his huge Storm teammates? Who takes on a crew of very, very big men, who failed to make the grand final and were not allowed to throw a single punch on field all year?

Big Nelson can now look forward to the awards night of The Frownlow Medal and The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame, which may or may not be full of drunken Aussie bogans.

Image: NuNa