Kerem Bulut gets supersized.

Former A-League player Kerem Bulut always wants more.

More action, more excitement, more adrenaline and more fries.

And more chances to be inducted into The Fronwlow Medal Hall of Fame.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL star Jarryd Hayne is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Bulut received his first Frownlow nomination for a variety of offences, and his second for demanding more fries.

The former Western Sydney Wanderers player was charged with intimidation in 2021 at Auburn McDonald’s in Sydney’s west. Sources claim Bulut and his friends argued with a staff member after Bulut tried to order more fries before the staff member could attempt to upsize him. The argument attracted police and Bulut was eventually granted conditional bail.

McDonald’s was a sponsor of the Wanderers at the time.

Bulut earned his first Frownlow nomination after being charged with assault, larceny and drug offences. He spent seven months in prison while awaiting trial for the for alleged assault of a man early in 2021. He was granted bail and forced to attend a drug rehabilitation program, as well as being told to report to police daily, avoid consuming drugs and alcohol, and to avoid any contact with the alleged victim.

The allegations stem from an alleged altercation with a man known to Bulut, who claims the former Young Socceroo assaulted him in an apartment in Sydney due to a dispute over $500. It is alleged that Bulut snatched the money from the man, and that seven months later the man demanded the money back, prompting the alleged assault.

It’s certainly a strange incident, but not the strangest incident which has resulted in a Fronwlow nomination. It’s also not known whether the alleged victim was eating, or in possession of, fries at the time.

The courts will also determine whether Bulut is guilty of assaulting a cellmate at Silverwater Prison while on remand in March 2021. The alleged victim was taken to hospital with a broken eye socket and bruising to his head.

While surrounding himself in controversy, the national junior representative also surrounded himself in glory. He scored seven goals in six games to win the Golden Boot at the 2010 AFC U/19 Championships, and he played for Australia at the 2011 FIFA U/20 World Cup. Unfortunately, his love of French Fries and his friends destroyed his international football career. He and other members of the Muslim Brotherhood Militants clashed with the police as far back as 2010, when Bulut was arrested for alleged offences including malicious wounding with intent to cause grievous bodily harm; robbery in company; participate in criminal group; assist criminal activity, affray and intimidation of court witnesses.

Police alleged the victims were attacked with knives in a carpark in Auburn and suffered wounds to the head, torso and leg, and that this attack was part of an ongoing feud involving incidents in the Sydney CBD and Bondi Beach. The police case against Bulut was ultimately withdrawn as the witnesses were unwilling to give evidence in court. Seems like Bulut got his fries after all.

Strengthening Bulut’s bid for induction into The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame is the four year ban he received from Turkish football after testing positive for cocaine while playing for Menemen Belediye in 2018.

Image: NuNa

Kerem Bulut is out of prison and into Frownlow contention.

Former A-League player Kerem Bulut can now attend the Frownlow awards night later this year after being released from prison.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL star Jarryd Hayne is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

The ex-Wanderers player has been nominated for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame after being charged with assault, larceny and drug offences. He spent seven months in prison while awaiting trial for the for alleged assault of a man early in 2021. He was granted bail and forced to attend a drug rehabilitation program, as well as being told to report to police daily, avoid consuming drugs and alcohol, and to avoid any contact with the alleged victim.

The allegations stem from an alleged altercation with a man known to Bulut, who claims the former Young Socceroo assaulted him in an apartment in Sydney due to a dispute over $500. It is alleged that Bulut snatched the money from the man, and that seven months later the man demanded the money back, prompting the alleged assault.

It’s certainly a strange incident, but not the strangest incident which has resulted in a Fronwlow nomination.

The courts will also determine whether Bulut is guilty of assaulting a cellmate at Silverwater Prison while on remand in March 2021. The alleged victim was taken to hospital with a broken eye socket and bruising to his head.

Strengthening Bulut’s bid for induction into The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame is the four year ban he received from Turkish football after testing positive for cocaine while playing for Menemen Belediye in 2018.

Image: NuNa

State of Origin game 1 will finish 7-7.

Log onto your betting apps folks because The Fronwlow Medal can reveal that the first game of the 2022 State of Origin series will finish 7-7. This year’s series is expected to be the tightest in recent years, although one factor could tip the result in the favour of the Blues.

New South Wales and Queensland will both field teams containing seven Frownlow nominees, including both captains.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL star Jarryd Hayne is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

James Tedesco leads the New South Wales nominees. He got into a scuffle with a teammate in the Italy squad way back in 2017. Joining Teddy are Kotoni Staggs, Jack Wighton, Nathan Cleary, Payne Haas, Junior Paulo and Stephen Crichton.

Meanwhile, DCE leads the nominees for the Maroons, also for fighting with a teammate. He once had a tiff with former Manly teammate Jackson Hastings, at a strip club. He will lead a team containing fellow nominees Kalyn Ponga, Selwyn Cobbo, Valentine Holmes, Cameron Munster, Ben Hunt and Josh Papali’i.

What could tip the opener?

The coaches.

New Queensland boss Billy Slater has never been nominated for Frownlow honours, whereas Brad Fittler was nominated for the hall of fame in 2018 after once being declared ‘The Drunkest Human Being Ever’. This title was given to him by police after he was found asleep on the steps of a police station as a young man.

Maybe Tedesco will make the difference. He was also nominated in 2021 for the infamous Squid Games joke.

It’s going to be a close one.

Who’s your money on?

Image: http://www.nrl.com

Matt Dunning Drops One on His Teammate in Race for Frownlow Honours.

Former Super Rugby player Matt Dunning broke the nose of a teammate in a determined effort to be inducted into The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame.

Dunning broke the nose of Waratahs teammate Des Tuiavii in 2003 during a drunken end-of-season celebration at which he was also accused of annoying members of the public.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. Former NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015 and fellow NRL star Jarryd Hayne is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

The former Wallaby claimed the incident occurred after he drank too much in order to forget about his ill-advised drop goal attempt which severely damaged the Waratahs chances of victory in the Super Rugby competition.

Sources from within the Waratahs camp, however, revealed the true cause of the scuffle between two gentlemen engaged in The Game They Play in Heaven. Both players had apparently volunteered to collect the next round of drinks from the bar, when the following conversation ensued.

“I insist,” said Dunning.

“No, I insist,” replied Tuiavii.

“No, Sir, you are far too kind.”

“No, please, allow me”

“No, I couldn’t possibly, I simply won’t allow it.”

“Your valour knows no end good Sir, but I implore you to allow me to procure the refreshments for our party…”

‘Whack!’ Dunning punches Tuiavii in the face.

“As I said, I insist”

Image: NuNa

Do professional footballers go to school?

One would be forgiven for thinking that professional footballers in Australia have never been to school, because apparently they are not prepared for life after football.

Almost every time a player is caught in a scandal and nominated for The Fronwlow Medal Hall of Fame, someone blames the player’s actions on the lack of preparation for life in the real world. Surely that is the purpose of school, to prepare children for life in the real world.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL star Jarryd Hayne is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

So, if professional footballers have been to school, even if they finish school aged 16 or 17, why are so many of them not prepared for life after sport?

Blame the schools.

That’s not fair, because most of the footballers’ classmates avoid scandals once they enter the real world.

Blame the teachers.

Many people will, and they’re not just footballers. Australian society loves blaming teachers for all of the ills and failures of its youth, but teachers are not to blame.

Blame the players.

Perhaps the footballers themselves are to blame for their inability to cope with life after football. Many school teachers will be familiar with the following scenarios:

Young footballers don’t listen to their teachers.

They don’t study.

They don’t do their classwork.

They don’t do their homework.

They disrupt classes.

They distract their classmates.

They disobey teachers.

They swear at teachers.

Teenage football stars say they don’t have to work hard at school because they are guaranteed a career in professional football. So they don’t work at school. The future footy stars are already earning more than their teachers because they are contracted to a club’s development team and believe they don’t have to study.

Teenage football heroes are notorious for their poor attitude at school, so much so that footy legends joke about their school boy antics during commentary. England international and former NRL player James Graham recently joked about skipping school to watch State of Origin as a child in England. Perhaps the attitude and actions of teenage footballers during their school years explains why they are not prepared for life after sport.

Roger Bannister

Roger Bannister was possibly the Usain Bolt of his generation. When he broke the four minute mile he was elevated to hero status for achieving the most sought-after feat of that era. At the time, the four minute mile was equivalent to the 10-second barrier for the 100m, the 2-hour barrier for the marathon or the 6-metre barrier for Pole Vault. Bannister was a global superstar, and even though he competed before the creation of the internet, professionalism, sponsorship and social media, he was surrounded by the fame of his achievement.

What did Bannister do after retiring from Athletics?

Did he get caught drink driving, assaulting someone, abusing alcohol, selling drugs or harassing women?

No, he returned to university to complete his medical degree.

Perhaps the ‘role models’ of today could use Bannister as their own ‘role model’. They don’t have to complete a medical degree, but they could follow his lead and devote themselves to something constructive which sets them up for life, instead of blaming their club or their sport for their scandalous behaviour.

Setting themselves up for life begins at school.

Image: Getty Images

What happens if Sam Fisher is not inducted into the hall of fame?

Supporters of Sam Fisher are concerned about what he will do if he is not inducted into The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame later this year. Fisher earned his nomination after recently being charged with dealing large quantities of illicit drugs between state borders.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL star Jarryd Hayne is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Teammates and people close to the former AFL player have suggested he turned to drug dealing due to personal issues including sporting injuries and the end of a romantic relationship, which sent him into depression.

‘The break-up f***ed him. She took the house, his superannuation, she got everything,’ a mate of Fisher’s told the Herald Sun newspaper.

Step 1 – Someone else has been blamed for a player’s downfall – in this case a woman.

Various articles in the media have also repeated the familiar tale that Fisher devoted himself entirely to football and was not prepared for life in retirement, and that the game, the club, his teammates and the players’ association should have done more to help him.

Step 2 – blame the game, the club, teammates and anyone else close to him.

Step 3 – blame the game for not setting players up for life after sport.

None of the articles mention the fact that Fisher is a grown man who earned a healthy income from professional football, and made the conscious decision to allegedly traffic drugs. Not just to buy or consume drugs, but to allegedly traffic them in such large quantities that police were apparently pleased to have discovered them.

Consider this:

Drug use and abuse is often prompted by trauma or personal setbacks, such as Fisher’s. Drug trafficking, however, required a degree of intelligence, meticulous planning, preparation and dedication. International drug cartels run like multinational corporations. Fisher was not (allegedly) El Chapo, but he was charged with trafficking a substantial amount of drugs.

If a romantic break up leads him to alleged drug trafficking, what will he do if he fails to win the greatest honour in Australian sport?

Maybe he’ll need to be locked up to be protected from himself.

Image: NuNa

Sam Fisher signs new contract.

Former AFL player Sam Fisher has been appointed to handle catering at The Frownlow Medal awards night later this year.

Fisher was awarded the contract, as well as a nomination for The Fronwlow Medal Hall of Fame, after being charged with allegedly trafficking large quantities of illicit drugs across state borders on a regular basis.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL star Jarryd Hayne is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Media reported that Fisher was arrested after a police raid on a house in suburban Melbourne, where they found methylamphetamine, 1,4-Butanediol and a Mercedes Benz, all alleged to be the proceeds of crime. The former St Kilda player was then charged with traffic large commercial quantity. According to reports, the drugs were being transported from Melbourne to Perth concealed in white goods.

This is not the first time Fisher has been involved in controversy, although it is his first Frownlow nomination. In 2011, he was the victim of an unprovoked attack in a Melbourne nightclub which left him with stitches in his head.

Fisher is expected to avoid serious punishment for the alleged crime as he has been pictured numerous times with a dog on social media. As outlined in a previous article on this very website, players who are photographed with a dog are likely to be forgiven by the Australian public.

This should leave Fisher plenty of time to contact his associates and ensure that the awards night for The Fronwlow Medal and The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame is the greatest party of the year.

Image: NuNa

Bizarre new contract clause for professional footballers.

Professional footballers in Australia have been ordered to get a pet dog in order to protect their public image after an off-field scandal.

Footballers from the four major codes have had the clause included in their contracts in case they commit an incident which earns them a nomination for The Fronwlow Medal or The Fronwlow Medal Hall of Fame.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL star Jarryd Hayne is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

“Australians will forgive anyone who owns a dog,” began a statement from the marketing firm contracted to oversee brand recovery across the four codes.

“Many professional footballers in Australia have a great need to repair their personal brand and this is why they will be required to buy a pet dog upon signing a contract to play first-grade in any of the four major codes.”

The branding experts explained that the pre-emptive clause assumes that every player will at some point commit a scandal that will bring themselves and their sport into disrepute.

“One needs only browse through http://www.instagram/thefrownlowmedal.com to see how many footballers commit scandals and to understand why this clause is necessary.”

The clause might surprise many Australians, until they consider the power of a photograph with a cute dog. It is seemingly impossible to advertise a product in Australia without including a dog, and the country’s most popular children’s TV series features a family of animated dogs. Australia also carries an unspoken belief that dog ownership improves people’s character and thus makes every footballer a great role model to young children.

Disgraced celebrities, sports stars and even politicians also understand the recuperative power of a photo with a pooch.

“Scott Morrison is a perfect example,” continued the PR experts, “throughout his less than stellar career as prime minister he has regularly been photographed with a pet dog, especially when his popularity falls. His opponent, Anthony Albanese, also made sure he included a dog in his photo ops during his recent isolation, proving that Aussies will forgive anyone who owns a dog.”

“If a dog can repair the brand of an Aussie politician, it will repair the brand of a footballer.”

A photo with a canine will apparently protect a footballer’s personal brand from alcohol and drug abuse, driving offences and social media gaffs, as well as racism, sexism and homophobia, and even from crimes such as assault, manslaughter, murder and sexual assault.

“It’s amazing how many Frownlow Medallists and hall of fame inductees could have been saved with nothing more than a photo with a dog.”

Image: NuNa

Quinten Lynch nominated for The Fronwlow Medal Hall of Fame.

Former AFL player Quinten Lynch has been nominated for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame after being charged with a driving offence.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL star Jarryd Hayne is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Lynch was charged with drink-driving, reckless driving and leaving the scene of an accident after failing to stop for a random breath test in 2004.

The former Collingwood and West Coast player will discover later this year if he has done enough to be inducted into The Fronwlow Medal Hall of Fame, and will be sent an Uber in order to ensure that he arrives at the awards night on time.

Image: NuNa

Ben Cousins drags Polo and McGuane into the spotlight.

Ben Cousins is a legend of The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame and his reputation has drawn two former AFL players into contention for Australia’s most prestigious inter-code award. Dean Polo and Luke McGuane earned their nomination after they became involved in a drunken incident in which Cousins punched teammate Daniel Connors outside a Sydney hotel in 2010.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. Former NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015 and Jarryd Hayne is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Polo and McGuane received a one-week suspension from Richmond for their part in the incident but of more importance is their nomination for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame, which could see their names listed alongside some of the true greats of Australian football.

For the full list of current nominees for The Frownlow Medal and The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame, go to www.instagram.com/thefrownlowmedal/

Image: NuNa