Tarrant the Pollie Puncher Nominated for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame.

Former AFL player Chris Tarrant has been nominated for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame for numerous offences, including an accusation of punching a politician.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015 and AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Tarrant allegedly punched ALP politician Damien Hale after the politician confronted Tarrant about his behaviour in a Darwin nightclub in 2007. Hale was unhappy that Tarrant had apparently bared his backside to a woman at the club and decided that it was his civic duty to reprimand the former Collingwood and Fremantle player, who expressed his democratic rights with his fist.

Tarrant was fined $5000 and handed a three-match suspension as a result of the incident, which was not his first. He was also fined $5000 by the Magpies in 2006 for breaking the players’ code of conduct after a fight at a nightclub in Port Melbourne.

Tarrant will be pleased to know that no politicians sit on the judging panel of The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame.

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Daniel Rioli backs Shai Bolton’s bid for The Frownlow Medal.

AFL player Daniel Rioli supports Shai Bolton‘s nomination for The Frownlow Medal and is ecstatic to receive his own after the teammates were involved in a fight at a night club recently.

The Richmond players were drawn into the fight when another man apparently acted inappropriately towards Rioli’s girlfriend. The altercation gave Bolton a fractured wrist, while Rioli was reportedly punched in the face and sustained a cut under his eye which required two stitches. Sources claim that Bolton stepped in to help Rioli with the unnamed patron.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Bolton will subsequently miss two to three games as the Tigers attempt to defend their premiership and remain the most dominant AFL team in recent history.

A nightclub fight is a great way to earn a nomination for The Frownlow Medal, and is just one of the off-field scandals used by 2016 medallist Corey Norman during his troubled career. However, Rioli and Bolton will find it tough to win the medal this year after their coach and club failed to take any punitive action against the players, arguing that they were both sticking up for their mates and were provoked. They can at least look forward to award’s night for The Frownlow Medal and The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame later this year where a drunken footballer is sure to hit on their girlfriends.

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James Roberts and Will Smith learn how to fight.

NRL players James Roberts and Will Smith are hoping their trip to a boxing match has taught them how to trade blows with the big boys, and has not only earned them a nomination for The Frownlow Medal.

Roberts and Smith breached bio-security protocols and will soon realise that that’s not going to be enough to win the medal when this year’s favourites have been accused, or found guilty, of sexual assault, as well as stabbing someone, common assault and a good old pub brawl.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

Roberts and Smith face potential sanctions from the NRL for a bio-security breach while attending the recent fight between Tim Tszyu and Dennis Hogan in Newcastle. Neither player wore a mask despite being told by the NRL that all players and staff must wear masks at public venues.

Roberts really should know better. He earned Frownlow nominations in 2016, 2017 and 2019, for incidents such as public drunkenness and alcohol abuse, accusations of harassing a female bartender and pulling another woman’s hair, fighting with security and using up many ‘last’ chances. All of these actions are far more likely to convince Frownlow judges than failing to wear a mask while watching two grown men beat the frownlow out of each other. Smith, meanwhile, receives his first nomination.

Roberts also earned his fourth ticket to the awards night for The Frownlow Medal and The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame, where he and Smith can party all night without a mask, or consequences.

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Corey Norman has something to say.

NRL player Corey Norman has a message:

“Don’t forget me!”

“I won The Frownlow Medal before and I’ll win it again,” said the 2016 medallist.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

Norman made the statement after receiving a possible two-match suspension and $20,000 fine from the NRL for his involvement in a street brawl in January. Norman and fellow league player James Segeyaro fought with a group of men outside a bar in Cronulla and were caught on security cameras.

Segeyaro and Norman are friends and business partners, jointly operating the clothing label YTKR, which stands for ‘You Know the Rules’. Apparently they don’t, because Segeyaro is a former Frownlow nominee and is currently serving a ban from the NRL due to the use of performance enhancing drugs. Norman won the medal in 2016 due to illicit drug use, social media controversy, a sex tape, intoxication and a salary cap scandal.

Will Norman win The Frownlow Medal in 2016?

No one has ever won it twice. It is possible, but the St George-Illawarra player faces strong opposition. Four league players are currently being investigated for violence against women, and another player for stabbing someone outside a church dance. However, none of these players has been found guilty, so Norman is still in with a fighting chance.

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Did Corey Norman lose The Frownlow Medal?

The Frownlow Medal Corey Norman won in 2016 has gone missing after the NRL player and James Segeyaro were attacked by a group of armed men in Cronulla recently. Norman and Segeyaro fought off the unidentified men who were attempting to steal the medal, which Norman is known to carry proudly on his person at all times.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The footballers escaped uninjured and explained their involvement in the wild brawl via the social media account of the company YKTR Sports, which they co-manage. YKTR stands for You Know The Rules. They claim Segeyaro was racially abused by the men and that Norman intervened to defend his friend. The argument soon turned physical and one of the attackers is alleged to have pulled a knife. The situation was eventually diffused and the players left, in the company of their female friends. At no point does the account mention The Frownlow Medal.

Did the attackers steal The Frownlow Medal?

Is Norman too embarrassed to admit that he lost it? After all, he is one of only six players in history to have won the award.

Are police assisting Norman to recover the medal? This seems unlikely, given Norman’s history with the police. He was once caught with illicit drugs, was photographed with known criminals and was the subject of a leaked sex tape. He also appeared in a video in which a man is taking drugs, was intoxicated at a Sydney nightspot and was involved in the Parramatta Eels salary cap scandal.

Segeyaro, meanwhile, is currently suspended by the NRL for testing positive to performance enhancing drugs and earned a previous Frownlow nomination for appearing on social media with known criminals.

Norman may face suspension from the early rounds of the 2021 NRL season due to the incident, while Segeyaro has undoubtedly harmed his chances of ever returning to the competition.

Meanwhile, The Frownlow Medal is still missing. Anyone with information about the whereabouts of the medal is asked to contact Frownlow judges via this page or www.instagram.com/thefrownlowmedal, or to contact YKTR Sports at http://www.yktr.com.au.

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Matt Henjak will not be sent home from Frownlow awards night.

Judges of The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame have assured former Wallaby Matt Henjak he will not be ejected from the award’s night of nights because, quite simply, anything goes.

Henjak will join some of the greats of Australian football at the gala ceremony after he committed a series of off-field indiscretions, including being sent home from a Wallabies tour.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. Former NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while former NRL player Ben Barba is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Henjak was sent home from the tour of South Africa in 2004 for involvement in an incident in a bar. Allegations followed that the victim of Henjak’s behaviour had been paid in order to stay silent.

The talented back began his bid for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame in 2000, when he recorded a conviction for assault in the ACT. He then trashed a motel room in Bombala, NSW, for which he was fined almost $9000 and placed on a good behaviour bond. At the time, he was already on a good behaviour bond for the earlier assault conviction.

Henjak returned with another tilt at Frownlow glory in 2008 when he was sacked by the Western Force for breaking the jaw of teammate Haig Sare during a fight at a Fremantle hotel. The fine this time was $5000 and the suspension was for eight Super Rugby matches.

The former Brumby is confident of his chances of induction into the Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame and even more confident of having a great time at the awards night alongside players who have been nominated for alcohol abuse, assault, domestic violence, imprisonment, public urination and drug offences.

With a guest list like this, anything goes.

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Two Bloody Idiots Nominated for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame.

Former AFL players Royce Vardy and Jay Schulz have been nominated for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame after being charged with drink driving. The two separate incidents are all the more severe due to the fact that the Transport Accident Commission was the major sponsor of their Richmond club when both players were charged.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL player Ben Barba is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Vardy committed his offence in 2001 and Schulz decided to surpass his colleague. In 2005, Schulz was found guilty of drink driving and speeding at a time when the slogan warning all Australians to obey the road rules was,

“If you drink and drive, you’re a bloody idiot.”

Schulz had his licence suspended for six months and was fined $5000. He also copped a swipe from Richmond managers, who told the press,

“…he’s been in the system three years, so the amount of education he’s had on this has been extensive.”

The former Tigers remain circumspect of their chances of induction. A driving offence while playing for a team sponsored by a government department promoting road safety was not enough to earn Geelong’s Joel Selwood a place in the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Schulz has a greater chance than Vardy, having been involved in a highly publicised training stoush with teammate Jackson Trengove in 2011.

If Schulz and Vardy do snag an invite to the awards ceremony, one imagines they will be catching the bus.

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Three amigos nominated for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame.

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Maverick Weller joins Joel Wilkinson and Jacob Gillbee in earning a nomination for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame due to a drunken incident in Thailand.

The three AFL players were handcuffed and detained by Thai police in Koh Phangan after allegedly becoming involved in a fight with an off-duty police officer outside a bar at the popular party spot, during an end of season trip in 2011.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while code-swapper Karmichael Hunt is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

The trio, along with teammate and former Frownlow nominee Campbell Brown, were later released without charge. Gillbee, however, holds a stronger claim to earning a place in the prestigious hall of fame as he was also charged with drink driving in 2013.

Being alleged of involvement in a bar brawl in Thailand is actually the same charge that saw NRL players Dylan Walker and Aaron Gray nominated for Frownlow honours. There is no evidence, nor allegation, that the AFL and NRL players were arrested due to any sort of international inter-code rivalry.

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