Jordan De Goey needs your support.

Australians are being asked to support AFL player Jordan De Goey as he struggles to cope with the self-inflicted scandals that have earned him three nominations for The Frownlow Medal this year.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

“Jordan’s had a tough year this year and it’s important that everyone in the country gets behind him in this time of need,” began a statement from the Collingwood Magpies.

“Aussies need to get behind one of their heroes, just as they got behind the diggers in WWI, and get him through this rough patch. The most important thing here is to protect Jordan’s welfare going forward, so that he can get back to playing great footy and being such a great Australian.”

Specifically, Australians are being asked to understand the hardship of the modern-day footballer and the enormous stress of being paid a fortune to play a game that you love, even while thousands of people lost their jobs during the pandemic. In addition, Aussies are asked to consider the stress of having to fly all the way to the United States, on a sponsor-funded trip, just to do a few sit ups and push ups.

“We’re also asking all Aussies to send positive affirmations and messages of support via social media, including a few ‘special’ photos if you know what I mean ladies,” winked his agent.

“He wouldn’t mind if people threw in a bit of beer money too.”

Aussies are also being reminded to support his sponsors by buying lots of Monster Energy drinks.

Image: NuNa

Jordan De Goey’s next move.

EXCLUSIVE: Disgraced AFL footballer Jordan De Goey has confirmed he will appear in the next series of Dancing With The Stars once he returns from The USA.

De Goey attracted the attention of the producers of the reality TV show after numerous famous performances on the dance floor.

“Jordan’s a great dancer,” the shows producers confirmed.

“And every time he goes onto a dance floor he makes headlines. That’s why he’s perfect for Dancing With The Stars.”

The producers are referring to two incidents in particular which made the Collingwood star famous. He recently got arrested for assault at a nightclub in New York, and is still awaiting the outcome of an investigation into the incident. He also damaged his hand at a nightclub in St Kilda some years ago. On that occasion, it wasn’t his actions on the dance floor that drew attention, but the fact that he said he damaged his hand playing with his dog, made his coach repeat the lie to the media, then finally admitted to the lie once the truth was revealed.

“That kind of questionable morality and ethics will take Jordan a long way on reality TV,” stressed the producers.

“Let’s not forget, apart from his nightclub antics, he’s also been fined or suspended by the Magpies for incidents such as speeding and driving without a licence.”

“We are certain Jordan will make a great addition to the lineup for DWTS, and our reality show is the perfect next step for the latest disgraced professional footballer. What’s more, Australian women will be beating down the door to be his partner now that he’s been cleared of groping a woman in New York.”

Image: NuNa

Dayne Beams receives a boost to his mental health.

Former AFL player Dayne Beams is feeling much better about himself since receiving a nomination for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame for a public spat with a venue manager while organising his wife’s birthday party.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Beams began arguing with a staff member of a venue in the Yarra Valley, Victoria, and the conflict spilled over into the venue’s website, his social media accounts and the mainstream media. The Collingwood premiership player complained that the stress of organising his wife’s 30th birthday, and the conflict with the staff member, had taken a toll on his mental health.

Beams claims he had difficulty with the staff member while trying to finalise the details of the party. The conflict prompted him to write a negative message on the venue’s website, and to threaten the venue with bad publicity across his popular social media accounts. The staff member then contact Melbourne radio station 3AW in response to the negative feedback, and claims Beams threatened to use his AFL status to harm the business.

Beams was quoted as posting:

“My mental health and confidence around organising this has taken a hit because of it and I think Shelley (staff member) should be ashamed. I will be recommending to everyone through my social media platforms and word of mouth to stay clear of Elina (sic) estate and Shelley. Really disappointing.”

One has to wonder how someone who suffers a mental health breakdown while trying to organise a birthday party ever managed to win an AFL premiership.

Fortunately for Beams, he has been invited to the awards ceremony for The Frownlow Medal and The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame later this year, where he doesn’t have to organise a thing. What’s more, he’ll be surrounded by other wayward footballers who can empathise with his struggles and give him a shoulder to cry on.

Image: NuNa

Jordan, what have you done this time?

AFL season is underway, so Jordan De Goey has earned another nomination for The Frownlow Medal. De Goey and teammate Jeremy Howe were caught holding a mobile phone in their dressing room recently and earned Frownlow nominations and a massive fine for the Collingwood Magpies.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

De Goey is a serial nominee for Frownlow honours. He has already been nominated in 2021, and attracted the attention of judges in 2017, 2018 and 2020. No one knows why he failed in 2019. Howe, meanwhile, earns his first nomination for the most prestigious prize in Australian sport.

The Magpies players were caught using their mobile phones in the dressing room during a game against the West Coast Eagles, and Collingwood was fined a total of $20,000. Players are strictly prohibited from using any kind of communication device during a game. Both players had come off injured before the end of the game and accessed their phones, which were supposed to be in a locked case.

Despite the fact that both players know the rules, they decided to use their phones. Despite the fact that both players knew there were cameras in the dressing rooms, and despite the fact that both players are fully-grown adults with experience in the AFL, the club will pay the fine. Collingwood took responsibility for not securing the phones, and absolved the players of any blame.

De Goey, meanwhile, explained his reasons for using the phone.

“I had to call Frownlow judges,” he said.

“Me and Jez want that medal. We’re sick of seeing it go to NRL players, and we were stoked when an AFL player won it last year. We need to keep it in the family, so we took out our phones, in front of the cameras, then called the judges to remind them that we deserve a medal. I’ve been nominated five times in five years, so I deserve more than just another nomination. Come on, it’s about time I won.”

Will this year be Jordan’s year?

Image: NuNa

Jordan de Goey nominated for The Frownlow Medal – again.

AFL player Jordan De Goey has collected his fourth nomination for The Frownlow Medal after facing court recently for driving offences.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Collingwood star was in familiar surroundings when he faced a judge, via video link, to answer charges related to a string of driving offences in 2019. De Goey is accused of driving while suspended and using a mobile phone while behind the wheel of a stationary but not parked vehicle in Melbourne.

This is now De Goey’s fourth nomination for Frownlow honours. He was nominated in 2017, 2018 and 2020, for offences such as blaming his dog for a hand injury which was actually sustained at a nightclub, and forcing his coach to repeat the lie to the media. He has also been charged with drink driving and has been hit with fines and suspensions. In addition, he is still the subject of an investigation into an alleged assault of a woman as far back as 2015.

De Goey just can’t keep himself away from trouble, and clearly can’t keep himself away from the after party for the Frownlow awards nigh to be held later this year.

Image: NuNa

Collingwood players should act like white people.

Collingwood Football Club once told AFL players of colour that they should act like white people if they wanted to be accepted in the sport and in Australian society.

Collingwood was accused of racism in 1993 when its fans racially abused St Kilda player Nicky Winmar during a game. In response, former club president, the late Allan McAlister, said of indigenous players,

”As long as they conduct themselves like white people, well, off the field, everyone will admire and respect … As long as they conduct themselves like human beings, they will be all right. That’s the key.”

But which white people should they emulate?

The following list includes the names of 22 white players or coaches from the Magpies, as well as the actions which make them perfect role models:

Damian Monkhorst

Racially abused indigenous player Michael Long during a game against St Kilda in 1995.

Brian Taylor

Refused to change the way he pronounced the name of player Orazio Fantasia while commentating for Channel 7, arguing that;

“We don’t pronounce Italian names in the full Italian way. We pronounce it with the Australianism in it, and that’s how we’ll continue to do it.”

This, despite the fact that Fantasia himself asked Taylor to pronounce his name differently.

Heath Shaw (Rat Pack 1)

Crashed into a parked car while driving drunk and then lied about the incident to the media. Suspended from AFL for gambling on matches, and detained by police for drunken behaviour in public.

Chris Tarrant (Rat Pack 2)

Allegedly punched ALP politician Damien Hale after the politician confronted Tarrant about his behaviour in a Darwin nightclub in 2007. Tarrant had apparently showed his backside to a woman at the club. Fined $5000 and handed a three-match suspension. Fined $5000 by the Magpies in 2006 for breaking the players’ code of conduct after a fight at a nightclub in Port Melbourne.

Ben Johnson (Rat Pack 3)

Charged with recklessly causing injury and unlawful assault after he tangled with teammate Chris Tarrant during a drunken brawl outside a Melbourne hotel in 2006.

Alan Didak (Rat Pack 4)

Proven links to criminals. Lied about his involvement in the Heath Shaw drink driving incident. Linked to the Melbourne CBD shooter, and the subject of an expose in a book by his ex-girlfriend Cassie Lane.

Dane Swan (Rat Pack 5)

Flasher 1

Sent naked selfies to an unknown woman. Selfies were published in a women’s magazine. Broke a club-imposed booze ban. Scuffled with a security guard in Federation Square. Admitted to illicit drug use…after retiring from football…while trying to promote a book. Caught drink driving. His Humpday podcast was axed after he and Scott Cummings made jokes about issues of sexual assault and mistreatment of women.

Travis Cloke

Flasher 2

Sent naked selfies to an unknown woman. Selfies were published in a women’s magazine.

Nathan Buckley (coach) and Brent Sanderson (assistant coach)

Buckley and Sanderson played a seemingly innocent game of tennis which was in breach of the AFL’s COVID-19 bio-security protocols in 2020, and the Collingwood coaches were served a $25,000 fine and forced to self-isolate for 24 hours.

Jordan de Goey

Blamed his dog.

Injured his hand during a late-night incident at a nightclub. Lied to his club, said he hurt his hand while playing with his dog. Made coach Nathan Buckley front the media and repeat the lie. Claimed alcohol was not a factor. Banned for 3 games, fined $5000, ordered to do community service. Arrested for drink driving, fined $10000 and suspended. Accused of assaulting a woman in 2015.

Lachie Keefe and Josh Thomas

Banned from AFL for use of performance enhancing drugs and illicit substances.

Jamie Elliott

One of the Frownlow urinators.

Arrested for urinating into a rubbish bin in North Melbourne in 2017 after enjoying himself too much at Derby Day.

Scott Cummings

His Humpday podcast was axed after he and Dane Swan made jokes about issues of sexual assault and mistreatment of women. The controversy also cost Cummings his role as AFL commentator on radio station 3AW.

Heath Scotland

Involved in a brawl which left one man unconscious at the Mulwala Ski Club near Yarrawonga. Formally charged with common assault, assault occasioning bodily harm and violent disorder. Given a two-year good behaviour bond without conviction. Also avoided conviction for an assault charge in 2005.

Steele Sidebottom and Lynden Dunn

Sidebottom and Dunn breached COVID-19 protocols after sharing an Uber and visiting the home of a Collingwood Magpies staff member in 2020. Sidebottom was seen near the staff member’s house the next morning and had to be driven home by police.

Jaidyn Stephenson

Banned for 10 matches after it was discovered he had bet on AFL games. Missed the remainder of the home and away season. Apparently bet on three games in which he was playing, and was also fined $20,000.

Quentin Lynch

Charged with drink driving, reckless driving and leaving the scene of an accident in 2004 after failing to stop at a random breath test.

Ryan Cook

Fractured the eye socket of a man and left him with 10 shattered facial bones during a fight at a pub in country Victoria in 2009. Fined $3500.

Sam Murray

Banned from AFL for 18 months for testing positive to cocaine. Claims he didn’t intentionally touch the cocaine.

These fine young men of Collingwood FC have all been nominated for The Frownlow Medal or The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame. Scotland was inducted into the hall of fame in 2020.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

These are the men indigenous players should aim to be like.

Image: NuNa

Collingwood FC proud to be nominated for The Frownlow Medal.

Eddie McGuire is proud that the Collingwood Magpies AFL club has been nominated for The Frownlow Medal due to the public reaction to a report which exposed a history of systemic racism at the club.

Collingwood becomes the second AFL club, and only the fourth football club, to be nominated for the highly prestigious award, which is normally reserved for individual players.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

McGuire is the long-standing president of the club and says he is not sorry that Collingwood is in contention for the most coveted award in Australian sport.

“Collingwood is the greatest sports team on earth, and it deserves to be nominated for The Frownlow Medal. We are very proud that years of racism, and our failure to address this toxic culture, have finally been recognised by judges of The Frownlow Medal.”

“Racism like this doesn’t exist in isolation. It has to be accepted, brushed aside, laughed off and legitimised by players, fans, coaches, officials and even senior management, and very few clubs have done this as well as my club.”

McGuire is also pleased to be the centre of attention once again, and to be the public face of a nomination which would normally elude him.

“I never played the game at a high level myself,” he explained, “so this is the only way I was ever going to be part of a nomination. Even when I joked that a female journalist should be drowned, or said Adam Goodes should promote King Kong, I couldn’t get nominated, so to be part of this latest scandal is fantastic – I feel like a million dollars”

The history of racism was recently exposed via the leak of a report called ‘Do Better’. The report was commissioned by Collingwood in an attempt to uncover the extent of racism at the club, and was also prompted by statements from former player Heritier Lumumba. Lumumba is of African descent and claimed on numerous occasions that he was subject to racist abuse while playing for the Magpies.

“Many players have been nominated for toxic masculinity, but no other club has earned a Frownlow nomination for toxic racism,” continued Mcguire.

The only other clubs to be nominated are AFL club West Coast Eagles, for a racist tweet, and NRL clubs Cronulla Sharks and South Sydney Rabbitohs. The Sharks were nominated when most of their players were kicked out of a club for drunken, anti-social behaviour, and the Rabbioths for covering up the off-field scandal of Sam Burgess.

Colingwood are now in the running for the most prestigious award in Australian sport, while McGuire is tipped to host the awards night for The Frownlow Medal and The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame, to be held later this year.

Image: NuNa

Jaidyn Stephenson firms as favourite for The Frownlow Medal.

Punters are placing huge bets on Jaidyn Stephenson to win The Frownlow Medal after the AFL player earned the harshest punishment of any footballer this year.

Stephenson was banned for 10 matches after it was discovered he had bet on AFL games, and he will miss the remainder of the home and away season. The Collingwood player apparently bet on three games in which he was playing, and was also fined $20,000.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015 and code-swapper Karmichael Hunt was the most recent recipient.

Stephenson’s punishment is more severe than any other Frownlow nominee in 2019. The previous favourite, NRL player Scott Bolton, was stood down for only five games after pleading guilty to assaulting a woman in a nightclub, while a host of other players were given shorter bans, or fines, for a vast range of scandals.

Former Cowboys player Ben Barba was banished from the NRL earlier this year, but was never actually found guilty of assaulting his partner, and fellow NRL player Dylan Walker was found not guilty of assaulting his partner.

Of course, Stephenson must still await the outcome of the court cases involving Rugby League players Jarryd Hayne and Jack de Belin, who were charged with allegedly sexually assaulting women. Now that Stephenson has some time on his hands, perhaps he will offer his services to the legal representatives of both of these players to ensure they are found not guilty.

According to news reports, none of the bets that Stephenson placed were successful. Let’s hope he has more luck with The Frownlow Medal.

Image: NuNa