Why Taylan May believes he did nothing wrong.

Taylan May did it for the boys. He did it for the club, and for the great game of rugby league. That’s why he believes he escaped punishment from the NRL for an alleged assault in Queensland in 2021.

May has been charged with assault occasioning bodily harm after allegedly dragging a man to the ground at a Sunshine Coast nightclub while celebrating Penrith’s grand final win, and has received a nomination for The Frownlow Medal.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL star Jarryd Hayne is the most recent recipient.

May is adamant he did nothing wrong, and is not afraid of punishment from the courts, because he did what he did to protect captain Nathan Cleary from hecklers.

“I stuck up for Cleary. I don’t think I was in the wrong,” he told the media.

“Anyone in my position, if they’re a good friend, they would have done what I did.”

He also did it for the team. Winning Frownlow honours is the greatest achievement for any Australia-based football team. Plenty of Panthers players have been inducted into The Fronwlow Medal Hall of Fame, including Craig Gower, but none of the medallists has played for Penrith. May’s own brother, Tyrone, played for the Panthers and came close to winning in 2021. He pleaded guilty to four counts of recording intimate images without consent. He was sentenced to 300 hours of community work and narrowly avoided jail time. Another offence saw him lose his contract.

Taylan’s actions earned praise from his coach Ivan Cleary.

“He’ll always put others above himself,” Cleary said to the media.

“Growing up it’s probably got him into a bit of trouble, but that’s why we love him, he’s constantly putting the team first and putting his brothers ahead of him.”

“He’s definitely not a selfish guy.”

He also did it for rugby league.

The NRL took no action against the rookie, suggesting they are trying to protect The Frownlow Medal, which they have won every year except 2020, when it went to AFL player Elijah Taylor. Punishing May would keep him on the sidelines and thus less able to remind Frownlow judges that a rugby league player deserves to win the medal yet again.

“I didn’t want the situation to escalate. (My teammates) are big names, I’m a nobody . . . the security were on my side. The situation for me, it doesn’t really faze me. I’ve put it behind me and just focused on the game,” May explained.

Has May done enough to keep The Frownlow Medal in the hands of the NRL for another year?

Image: NuNa

No, the Penrith Panthers can’t be trusted.

Judges of The Frownlow Medal recently asked whether the Penrith Panthers NRL team could be trusted, and Nathan Cleary, Tyrone May and Stephen Crichton have proven that the answer is no.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

Cleary, May and Crichton clearly cannot be trusted with The Frownlow Medal, after they and teammates damaged the NRL premiership trophy during grand final celebrations. Their behaviour resulted in fines and sanctions from the NRL.

May is the least trustworthy. He has been stood down indefinitely and fined $7,500 for a social media post during the victory party which referred to his sex tape scandal from a few years ago. Cleary was fined $7,000 and Crichton $4,000 for disrespecting the famous Summons – Provan trophy, which was broken and placed in a pram and a baby carrier.

Crichton earns his first Frownlow nomination, while Cleary and May are well known to judges. Cleary earned his nomination in 2020 for the famous Tik Tok video, while May was in the running for the award in 2019 after distributing a sex tape without a person’s consent.

The trio have been invited to the Frownlow awards night later this year, but security guards will be on hand to stop them from damaging The Frownlow Medal – unless of course one of them manages to win it.

Image: NuNa

Tyrone May keeps sex tape at hand.

NRL player Tyrone May always has his leaked sex tape close at hand in case he needs some light relief or another nomination for The Frownlow Medal.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

May had plenty of time to watch the video in 2019, when the NRL stood him down for the entire season, and he is known to use it to psyche himself up for big games or to relax after a gruelling training session.

In 2018, May was punished for filming and distributing a sex tape without consent. This is the same tape he referred to on social media while celebrating the Panthers grand final win.

The instagram post quotes lyrics from a song by rapper Drake:

“And the dirt that they threw on my name/turned to soil and I grew up out it/time for y’all to figure out what y’all gon’ do about it,”

He accompanied the lyrics with a picture of himself arriving at Parramatta Local Court for his trial. The same trial in which he pleaded guilty to committing the crime, for which he missed the 2019 season in accordance with the NRL’s no-fault stand down policy. He was also given a three-year good behaviour bond and ordered to perform 300 hours of community service.

On the most recent post, Panthers teammate Stephen Crichton wrote,

“They hate but then they all copy.”

It’s not clear who they are or what they copy, but May’s post also drew support from Spencer Leniu, Nathan Cleary, James Fisher-Harris, Viliame Kikau, Brian To’o, Moses Leota and Apisai Koroisau.

Most of these players comprise May’s post-game prayer group and are devout Christians.

Image: NuNa

Tick, Tock, Tick, Tock; Tyrone May to spend more time on the sideline.

NRL player Tyrone May will miss more NRL games after a TikTok video revealed his involvement in a social distancing breach, and this has earned him a second nomination for The Frownlow Medal.

May has been suspended for two games from the NRL competition, which is scheduled to resume on May 28, but was already suspended for his role in a sex tape scandal in 2019. The sex tape scandal created massive off-field drama for the Penrith Panthers and earned May his first Frownlow nomination.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL player Ben Barba is the most recent recipient.

May shares a house with Panthers teammate Nathan Cleary, who appeared in a TikTok video dancing with a group of young women in their house during the COVID19 pandemic, in clear breach of social distancing regulations. May does not appear in the video, but he was punished for gathering in a large group, and for failing to cooperate with the NRL Integrity Unit when the issue first arose.

Fortunately for the young women, May did not invite them to appear in a video of his making, even though it would obviously have been very tasteful.

May will now have more time to study video production and editing while he sits out a large proportion of an already shortened NRL season.

Image: NuNa