Extreme Gardening with Rex Hunt.

Former AFL player Rex Hunt orchestrated a masterful publicity stunt to announce his return to the big screen as host of Extreme Gardening.

Hunt was recently caught on camera appearing to wield a garden fork during a road rage incident in Victoria, and has earned himself a nomination for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame as well as valuable publicity for the new series.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL star Jarryd Hayne is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Hunt was reportedly involved in a minor road accident in suburban Melbourne which forced both drivers out of their cars. Reports indicate that the other male driver threw a punch. Hunt then channeled his experience as an AFL commentator and host of Rex Hunt’s Fishing Adventure to earn valuable publicity for Extreme Gardening. The former full-forward walked back to his car and retrieved a garden fork, with which witnesses alleged he lunged at the other driver. He was then heard yelling:

“You wanna die? You wanna die? Do you want to die?”

But that’s not all.

Hunt appeared to walk several laps of the block to cool down, but was actually employing his TV smarts to provoke the other driver into chasing him on foot and drawing out the conflict, the same way a TV writer will draw out a successful series for as many episodes as possible.

The other man obliged, and is said to have “run after Rex in an aggressive manner” and then was seen “throwing punches at trees”, according to a Channel Nine reporter. It’s not clear whether Hunt anticipated or orchestrated the shadow boxing, but it certainly made for great vision for the mainstream media which lapped up the story and gave Hunt the publicity he so desperately craves.

Hunt’s wife eventually succeeded in calling him back to his car and no official police report was made as it later became clear that the incident was a carefully-planned publicity stunt.

“It’s gonna be massive folks,” declared Hunt at the official launch of Extreme Gardening held just after the road rage incident.

“This is Extreme Gardening. Not your namby-pamby, woke, pinko, bolshie, luvy-duvvy organic gardening shows with wogs and permacultural pretty boys. This is real gardening for real men. And don’t expect to see any women on the show, they should never be allowed as far as the garden, let alone in an AFL commentary booth.”

Extreme Gardening will be full of action and men being men, just like the good old days. You thought today was crazy, wait till the show comes to 7Mate later this year.”

Hunt was then asked to confirm whether he actually said:

“You wanna die? You wanna die? Do you want to die?”

He replied:

“You bloody bet I did mate. That’s what I used to say to the little fishies before I cast my line on my fishing show, and I’ll say it a lot on Extreme Gardening, wait and see.”

As well as priceless publicity, the stunt earned Hunt a nomination for The Fronwnlow Medal after years of trying.

The former St Kilda, Geelong and Richmond player made his first attempt in 2004. He was forced to remove his pants and shoes after setting off a metal detector at an airport, so he stole ten metal forks from the Qantas club and took them onto a Qantas flight to highlight flaws in airport security. He was detained upon arrival in Melbourne for questioning and released without charges.

His second attempt involved good ol’ casual racism, a Frownlow staple. While commentating in 2005, he called Indigenous AFL player Leon Davis ‘as black as a dog’ and was later forced to apologise. After a racist slur, he resorted to another Fronwlow staple, a drunken fight. He and his son were involved in a drunken scuffle with teenagers in Byron Bay in 2005.

Hunt’s third attempt involved infidelity and hypocrisy. In 2006 he finally confessed to cheating on his wife with different women, who he apparently paid during the fifteen year period. The cheating apparently cost him up to $1000 a week with one woman, and forced him to admit he had been hypocritical after attacking other famous people for infidelity.

Speaking about the cheating on radio, he said:

“That’s what a fool does. I’m invincible, I’m paying money…uh…The girl’s happy, she’s got no money, I got my rocks off. How good is this?”

Finally, Hunt sought more attention in 2022 when claiming that women should not be AFL commentators.

Fans of reality TV can expect more of these harmless high jinks when Extreme Gardening premieres on 7Mate later this year.

Image: http://www.radiotoday.com.au

Jake Carlisle snorts cocaine…that’s tonight on A Current Affair.

Former AFL player Jake Carlisle can thank A Current Affair for his nomination for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame. Carlisle was filmed by the Channel 9 program snorting cocaine on the same day that he was traded from Essendon To St Kilda in 2015.

And they say all publicity is good publicity.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015 and AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Carlisle received a two match suspension for his actions, but it didn’t damage his form too much, because he was already serving a suspension for his role in the Essendon performance enhancing drugs saga.

Carlisle’s appearance on A Current Affair does make one ponder…is “Footballer Snorts Cocaine’” even a news story these days? Maybe only if they bite a dog at the same time.

St Kilda Club officials claimed he faced a much harsher penalty than a media grilling upon his arrival at St Kilda.

“…he’s got to front Nick Riewoldt and our leadership group,’ they explained.

The club extrapolated on the reaction of the leadership group.

“They’re absolutely filthy. They’ve done a lot of work to really be clear on what it is they want our club to stand for.”

To find out exactly what Australian football clubs stand for, go to www.instagram.com/thefrownlowmedal/

Image:NuNa

Steven Lawrence has the integrity of a property developer.

Former AFL player Steven Lawrence prepared for a career as a property developer during a football career plagued with alcohol abuse, fights and drink driving, which earned him a nomination for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL player Ben Barba is the most recent recipient.

Lawrence pleaded gulity to assault during a fight in a St Kilda pub on the eve of the grand final in 2007, and was subsequently ordered to pay a fine of $5000. His lawyer told the court that Lawrence swung his fist at the victim’s head, causing the victim to fall to the ground unconscious. When translated into language accessible to the average footy player, that means – he punched a guy in the head and knocked him out.

It was alleged that the fight broke out when Lawrence pushed a pool cue close to a woman’s face, and her boyfriend retaliated. Reports indicate that Lawrence left the scene and refused to comment during a police interview when he was shown footage of the incident.

Lawrence had already landed himself in trouble in his fledgling career. While playing for Brisbane in 2000, he injured a finger after smashing a glass door panel at a teammate’s 21st party, and was fined by the Lions.

The former St Kilda and Brisbane player also attracted criticism from other AFL players, who claimed that his heavy drinking and partying made him a bad influence on other players. It takes a lot of effort to be a bad influence on an AFL player. Lawrence was eventually sacked by St Kilda after he was caught drink driving. His car rammed into a telegraph pole and he ended up in hospital with a damaged vertebrae.

After a career full of off-field incidents, Lawrence was advised to enter rehabilitation for his alcohol abuse, but his lawyer claimed he intended to enter property development.

Image: NuNa

Richmond players make a grab at The Frownlow Medal.

“I’ll get inside you and take you to Tigerland,” promised one Richmond player to another, and the experience was deemed so pleasurable that it was repeated many times. In the locker room, singing the team song while celebrating a victory, and in full view of the cameras, Jayden Short, Nick Vlastuin and Jack Riewoldt touched their teammates in very private places and thus earned themselves a nomination for The Frownlow Medal.

Short, Vlastuin and Riewoldt were caught on camera touching teammates’ genitals and attempting to put their hands in places that a footballer’s fingers have not been since Frownlow Hall of Fame inductee John Hopoate put his where the sun don’t shine during a rugby league game. Reports also emerged that St Kilda player Dan Butler is fond of a fondle after the game, and may have picked up the habit while playing at Richmond.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL player Ben Barba is the most recent recipient.

The nominations are some of the most bizarre in Frownlow history, and the ‘hand balls’ sparked a divisive debate across social media. Some fans believe its just harmless fun between teammates and part of professional sport, while others claim the habit is disgraceful, disgusting, a bad example by role models, and even constitutes sexual assault.

The players have also failed to explain their fascination with Mabior Chol, who was on the receiving end of their touching on numerous occasions. Fans are also asking what the Richmond players would have done if they’d lost the games.

The incident became even more controversial when Richmond staff shut down questions about the grabbing during a post-match press conference. The AFL, meanwhile, issued an official statement labelling the actions “…inappropriate, unacceptable and juvenile.”

All four players have been invited to attend the awards night for The Frownlow Medal and The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame later this year, and fellow nominees are being warned not to turn their backs.

Image: NuNa

AFL players warned about sleeping through Frownlow awards presentation.

Four AFL players have received official notification from the judges of The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame advising them to stay awake during the award’s night of nights.

Zac Dawson, Rhys Stanley, Jack Steven and Paul Cahill all received nominations for the highly coveted award after their St Kilda club suspended them for mixing sleeping tablets with alcohol in 2011.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015 and NRL player Ben Barba is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

The foolhardy four concocted the mix while on a St Kilda pre-season training camp in New Zealand and, as well as being suspended, were fined $5000 each and told to find a real job for the duration of their suspension.

“An invitation to the awards ceremony of The Frownlow Medal and The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame is a privilege,” stated the notification.

“Players must respect the occasion and as an absolute minimum must stay awake and offer their full attention to all nominees and award recipients as an act of common courtesy. The judges and organisers of the awards are aware of these player’s fondness for sleeping tablets and have reminded, in the strongest possible language, to refrain from consuming such substances during the evening.”

The organisers have also assigned another AFL legend to keep a watchful eye over the quartet.

“We have enlisted the services of Brendan Fevola. We are confident he can keep them awake during the ceremony.”

Image:Nuna