Alastair Clarkson nominated for The Fronwlow Medal, again.

Former AFL player Alastair Clarkson has received his second nomination for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame due to his involvement in the Hawthorn Hawks racism scandal.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL star Jarryd Hayne is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

The ABC has revealed that senior coaches and officials made exceptional demands on Indigenous players all for the sake of winning football games. The allegations involve Clarkson and his assistant at the time, Chris Fagan.

During the time in which Hawthorn won four premierships, the club is accused of bullying, removing First Nations players from their homes and relocating them, and telling them to choose between their careers and their families.

Clarkson is also accused of coercing players to remove SIM cards and insert new ones in attempts to cut them off from their partners and focus them entirely on the club. In each case, the player was a young First Nations draftee in his first five years with the club.

Furthermore, the premiership-winning coach was accused of intimidating players and attempting to separate couples at the earliest stages of pregnancies and parenthood, and demanding that one player should instruct his partner to terminate a pregnancy. It is also alleged Clarkson insisted on visiting a player’s house and offered commentary on the house’s cleanliness.

As a result of the alleged bullying, two of the families have recently been provided with mental health assistance from the AFL Players’ Association due to the suicide risks associated with reliving their traumas for the sake of the official review into the accusations.

Clarkson has also been nominated for Frownlow honours before. In 2017, he was nominated for the hall of fame for verbally abusing a 19-year-old match official at his son’s footy game, punching a hole in the wall of a coaches box, calling a journalist a ‘cockhead’ and grabbing the throat of a fan outside a pub.

Image: Getty Images

Hawthorn Hawks nominated for The Frownlow Medal.

Hawthorn Hawks AFL club has been nominated for The Fronwlow Medal after shocking revelations about its treatment of Indigenous players.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL star Jarryd Hayne is the most recent recipient.

The ABC has revealed that senior coaches and officials made exceptional demands on Indigenous players all for the sake of winning football games. The allegations involve then coaches Alistair Clarkson and Chris Fagan.

During the time in which Hawthorn won four premierships, the club is accused of the following acts:

Bullying.

Removing First nations players from their homes and relocating them, telling them to choose between their careers and their families.

Coaches coercing players to remove SIM cards from their phones and insert new ones in attempts to cut them off from their partners and focus them entirely on the club. In each case, the player was a young First Nations draftee in his first five years with the club.

Intimidation tactics including attempts to separate couples at the earliest stages of pregnancies and parenthood, and the alleged demand that one player should instruct his partner to terminate a pregnancy.

Allegations that Hawthorn has only offered them assistance since becoming aware of ABC Sport’s investigation, and that the club has made no public comment on the report’s findings despite being in receipt of the allegations for weeks.

As a result of the alleged bullying, two of the families have recently been provided with mental health assistance from the AFL Players’ Association due to the suicide risks associated with reliving their traumas for the sake of the review.

One unnamed player alleges that when he told his teammates and coaches that his partner was pregnant, Clarkson and Fagan took him into an office and urged him to “get rid” of his partner, move into the home of an assistant coach and “kill my unborn kid.” He was also told to remove his SIM card so he had no contact with his family.

“They told me I’d be living with one of the other coaches from that night onwards.”

The player’s phone was disconnected and his family did not know where he was.

Hawthorn officials refused a request to meet the player’s partner in her home. Instead, they made the player meet his partner outside in the street. The club claimed the partner’s father was a threat to the player.

The club did not allow the player to meet his partner at all.

The woman was told that the club had decided it was better for his footy career if he didn’t become a father. She was also told to contact the club, and not her partner, for any matter relating to the pregnancy.

The couple was allegedly forced to move house when the woman was 37 weeks pregnant.

Allegations that Clarkson insisted on visiting the player’s house and offered commentary on the house’s cleanliness.

The couple feeling pressured into the decision to terminate a subsequent pregnancy.

Reports that the player later attempted suicide.

Allegations that another player was told to break up with his partner, and that Clarkson, Fagan and a club official did so at the player’s home.

In response to the allegations, Hawthorn said:

“Earlier this year the Hawthorn Football Club engaged external First Nations consultants to liaise with current and former First Nations players and staff to learn more about their experience at the club,” the statement began.

“This important work has raised disturbing historical allegations that require further investigation. Upon learning of these allegations, the club immediately engaged AFL Integrity as is appropriate.

Hawthorn is not the first football club to be nominated for Frownlow honours, and not the first club to be nominated for racism. Collingwood was also found to have mistreated Indigenous players and to have covered up that mistreatment. All of this took place since the AFL introduced an Indigenous round.

Clarkson has also been nominated for Frownlow honours before. In 2017 he was nominated for the hall of fame for verbally abusing a 19-year-old match official at his son’s footy game, punching a hole in the wall of a coaches box, calling a journalist a ‘cockhead’ and grabbing the throat of a fan outside a pub.

The question is, after this saga and the Collingwood saga, plus the treatment of Adam Goodes and other Indigenous players, will anything change?

Image: Hawthorn Hawks

Extreme Gardening with Rex Hunt.

Former AFL player Rex Hunt orchestrated a masterful publicity stunt to announce his return to the big screen as host of Extreme Gardening.

Hunt was recently caught on camera appearing to wield a garden fork during a road rage incident in Victoria, and has earned himself a nomination for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame as well as valuable publicity for the new series.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL star Jarryd Hayne is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Hunt was reportedly involved in a minor road accident in suburban Melbourne which forced both drivers out of their cars. Reports indicate that the other male driver threw a punch. Hunt then channeled his experience as an AFL commentator and host of Rex Hunt’s Fishing Adventure to earn valuable publicity for Extreme Gardening. The former full-forward walked back to his car and retrieved a garden fork, with which witnesses alleged he lunged at the other driver. He was then heard yelling:

“You wanna die? You wanna die? Do you want to die?”

But that’s not all.

Hunt appeared to walk several laps of the block to cool down, but was actually employing his TV smarts to provoke the other driver into chasing him on foot and drawing out the conflict, the same way a TV writer will draw out a successful series for as many episodes as possible.

The other man obliged, and is said to have “run after Rex in an aggressive manner” and then was seen “throwing punches at trees”, according to a Channel Nine reporter. It’s not clear whether Hunt anticipated or orchestrated the shadow boxing, but it certainly made for great vision for the mainstream media which lapped up the story and gave Hunt the publicity he so desperately craves.

Hunt’s wife eventually succeeded in calling him back to his car and no official police report was made as it later became clear that the incident was a carefully-planned publicity stunt.

“It’s gonna be massive folks,” declared Hunt at the official launch of Extreme Gardening held just after the road rage incident.

“This is Extreme Gardening. Not your namby-pamby, woke, pinko, bolshie, luvy-duvvy organic gardening shows with wogs and permacultural pretty boys. This is real gardening for real men. And don’t expect to see any women on the show, they should never be allowed as far as the garden, let alone in an AFL commentary booth.”

Extreme Gardening will be full of action and men being men, just like the good old days. You thought today was crazy, wait till the show comes to 7Mate later this year.”

Hunt was then asked to confirm whether he actually said:

“You wanna die? You wanna die? Do you want to die?”

He replied:

“You bloody bet I did mate. That’s what I used to say to the little fishies before I cast my line on my fishing show, and I’ll say it a lot on Extreme Gardening, wait and see.”

As well as priceless publicity, the stunt earned Hunt a nomination for The Fronwnlow Medal after years of trying.

The former St Kilda, Geelong and Richmond player made his first attempt in 2004. He was forced to remove his pants and shoes after setting off a metal detector at an airport, so he stole ten metal forks from the Qantas club and took them onto a Qantas flight to highlight flaws in airport security. He was detained upon arrival in Melbourne for questioning and released without charges.

His second attempt involved good ol’ casual racism, a Frownlow staple. While commentating in 2005, he called Indigenous AFL player Leon Davis ‘as black as a dog’ and was later forced to apologise. After a racist slur, he resorted to another Fronwlow staple, a drunken fight. He and his son were involved in a drunken scuffle with teenagers in Byron Bay in 2005.

Hunt’s third attempt involved infidelity and hypocrisy. In 2006 he finally confessed to cheating on his wife with different women, who he apparently paid during the fifteen year period. The cheating apparently cost him up to $1000 a week with one woman, and forced him to admit he had been hypocritical after attacking other famous people for infidelity.

Speaking about the cheating on radio, he said:

“That’s what a fool does. I’m invincible, I’m paying money…uh…The girl’s happy, she’s got no money, I got my rocks off. How good is this?”

Finally, Hunt sought more attention in 2022 when claiming that women should not be AFL commentators.

Fans of reality TV can expect more of these harmless high jinks when Extreme Gardening premieres on 7Mate later this year.

Image: http://www.radiotoday.com.au

Justin Sherman’s Racist Slur.

Former AFL player Justin Sherman has been nominated for The Fronwlow Medal Hall of Fame after admitting to a racist slur.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL star Jarryd Hayne is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Sherman was playing for the Western Bulldogs in 2011 when he racially vilified a Gold Coast Suns player during a match, and later admitted to the offence.

Sherman was suspended for four matches and made a donation of $5000 to a charity. He also publicly apologised to the player involved and took part in the Bulldogs multicultural and community programs, and volunteered for the Red Dust Role Models program which provides mentoring and support in remote indigenous communities.

Sherman participated in these programs after he was caught racially vilifying a player on the field. This begs the questions:

Would he have participated in these programs if he was not serving a punishment?

Do professional footballers participate in such programs of their own free will, or only when required to by their club’s PR team?

Image: NuNa

James Tedesco launches $Quid Games.

NRL player James Tedesco has called out professional footballers during the launch of his new reality TV show $Quid Games, which will feature Frownlow nominees whose scandals have cost them at least $10,000.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

Tedesco was inspired to create the show after his own recent controversy involving accusations of racial vilification and reference to the South Korean Netflix series Squid Game. The NSW captain was accused of calling out the name of the show at a woman of Asian descent after a night of heavy drinking with teammates. The incident resulted in a $10,000 fine and charges of drunk and disorderly behaviour.

Squid Game is based on a fictional reality TV show which is similar to the shows on which many footballers appear after an off-field scandal destroys their public image. For this reason, Tedesco was motivated to provide yet another opportunity his colleagues to rescue their personal brand.

“It’s like ‘quid’ you know, like the word for money,” he explained during the launch.

“It’s called quid, with a dollar sign, because any player who wants to go on the show has to have committed a scandal for which they were fined at least $10,000, and have at least one nomination for The Frownlow Medal. So, like, it has to be pretty serious, more than just public urination or getting caught with ecstasy.”

The Sydney Roosters star went on to explain that players who have not been fined a minimum of $10,000 could still join other Frownlow nominees in a quinella, trifecta, quadie or ‘$Quid Game Multi’ and combine their fines for a chance to be included in the show.

Once selected, players will be supplied with copious amounts of alcohol, illicit drugs, prescription drugs, sports gambling accounts, smart phones, internet, toilet cubicles, social media accounts, motor vehicles and access to the opposite sex, and be prompted to commit as many disgraceful acts as possible each episode. Fans will then vote for the role model who has committed the greatest scandal, and that player will be crowned the winner.

What does the winner receive?

The most prestigious prize in Australian sport: The Frownlow Medal.

Image: NuNa

Brad Fittler’s offensive on air blunder.

Former NRL player Brad Fittler made a terrible on air blunder and has earned himself another nomination for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame.

Fittler was commentating on the game between South Sydney and Parramatta when a Rabbitohs player passed the ball to a teammate and got it back from his teammate before diving over the line to score, prompting Fittler to call the Souths player an ‘Indian Giver’ – not once but twice.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

The rugby league legend may not be aware but the term Indian Giver is considered offensive in the United States. The phrase has its origins in the early days of the colonisation of the US, and referred to the tradition of giving a gift and expecting a gift in return. It’s original use might have been innocent, but it came to describe people so ungenerous that they take back gifts as soon as they are given or immediately demand a present in return. In more recent times, it was used in a derogatory way to refer to First Nations people of North America.

The NSW Blues player and coach earned his first Frownlow nomination in 2018. He was once labelled ‘the drunkest human being ever’ by police after he was found lying outside Glebe Police Station in Sydney. On another occasion, he was drunk and half naked and tried to enter the hotel room of two women.

Fittler has now been given another chance to enter The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame, as well as free enrolment in a history course at an adult community college.

Image: NuNa

Taylor Walker is a great Aussie role model.

AFL player Taylor ‘Tex’ Walker proved why he and other footballers are great role models for young Australians when he made a racist comment about an Indigenous player on an opposing team recently. Walker was found guilty of racism during a SANFL game and earns his second nomination for The Frownlow Medal.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

Walker has been banned for six AFL games after it was proven that he made a racist comment during the game in which he was not playing. He now misses the last three games of the 2021 season and the first three games of the 2022 season. He also apologised and will make a donation of $20,000 to an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander program in SA.

Walker made the comments after the controversy surrounding the recent Collingwood Magpies racism scandal, and the enormous racism scandal which drove Sydney Swans champion Adam Goodes out of the game.

“I’m a great Aussie role model,” stated Walker.

“Me and other footy players are big role models to young Aussie kids and I take this role seriously. Australia is a racist country, so I made a racist comment. Australia is really racist towards Aboriginal people, so I made a racist comment towards an Aboriginal person.”

“I’m also trying to be a great role model to my son. I want him to grow up to be just like me.”

Tex was first nominated for Frownlow honours in 2016, after he engaged in a heated social media battle with tennis player Nick Kyrgios. There is no suggestion that Walker argued with Kyrgios because the controversial tennis player is of Greek extraction.

Image: NuNa

Are they racist, or silly little boys?

Three AFL players have been sent back to primary school to learn the difference between racism and a harmless schoolyard game. Jack Redden, Alex Witherden and Jamaine Jones will attend Year 1 with Ms. Pankhurst after making a hand signal in a team photo that many people associate with white supremacist movements, but which the players claim refers to a children’s game.

The West Coast Eagles players have earned nominations for The Frownlow Medal after they made the upside-down three-finger OK gesture which Australian mass murderer Brenton Tarrant used during a courtroom appearance in 2019. The official photo was posted on the Eagles official social media page and Jones later tagged Redden and Witherden, along with a tears of joy face emoji.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

Club bosses quickly defended the players after a strong reaction on social media. They argued that the players were not making a racist gesture, but instead referencing the ‘Circle Game’. In this game, the same hand signal is used by one player to force other players to look below their waistline. If other players do so, they get a punch in the arm.

It seems the players won’t even receive a slap on the wrist.

Jones Redden and Witherden are adults. They are old enough to hold a driver’s licence, drink alcohol and vote, and they are sure to stand out when they sit on the mat during story time with Ms. Pankhurst. They will not stand out intellectually or emotionally however, and will receive the same instruction about avoiding racism as their 6-year-old classmates.

The West Coast club is familiar with racist controversy. In 2016, the Eagles became the first club to earn a Frownlow nomination after its social media channel used the term ‘Yellow Peril’ in a promotional post.

Jones, Redden and Withderden, meanwhile, can still play for the Eagles as long as they get a signed permission note from their parent or guardian.

Image: NuNa

Collingwood players should act like white people.

Collingwood Football Club once told AFL players of colour that they should act like white people if they wanted to be accepted in the sport and in Australian society.

Collingwood was accused of racism in 1993 when its fans racially abused St Kilda player Nicky Winmar during a game. In response, former club president, the late Allan McAlister, said of indigenous players,

”As long as they conduct themselves like white people, well, off the field, everyone will admire and respect … As long as they conduct themselves like human beings, they will be all right. That’s the key.”

But which white people should they emulate?

The following list includes the names of 22 white players or coaches from the Magpies, as well as the actions which make them perfect role models:

Damian Monkhorst

Racially abused indigenous player Michael Long during a game against St Kilda in 1995.

Brian Taylor

Refused to change the way he pronounced the name of player Orazio Fantasia while commentating for Channel 7, arguing that;

“We don’t pronounce Italian names in the full Italian way. We pronounce it with the Australianism in it, and that’s how we’ll continue to do it.”

This, despite the fact that Fantasia himself asked Taylor to pronounce his name differently.

Heath Shaw (Rat Pack 1)

Crashed into a parked car while driving drunk and then lied about the incident to the media. Suspended from AFL for gambling on matches, and detained by police for drunken behaviour in public.

Chris Tarrant (Rat Pack 2)

Allegedly punched ALP politician Damien Hale after the politician confronted Tarrant about his behaviour in a Darwin nightclub in 2007. Tarrant had apparently showed his backside to a woman at the club. Fined $5000 and handed a three-match suspension. Fined $5000 by the Magpies in 2006 for breaking the players’ code of conduct after a fight at a nightclub in Port Melbourne.

Ben Johnson (Rat Pack 3)

Charged with recklessly causing injury and unlawful assault after he tangled with teammate Chris Tarrant during a drunken brawl outside a Melbourne hotel in 2006.

Alan Didak (Rat Pack 4)

Proven links to criminals. Lied about his involvement in the Heath Shaw drink driving incident. Linked to the Melbourne CBD shooter, and the subject of an expose in a book by his ex-girlfriend Cassie Lane.

Dane Swan (Rat Pack 5)

Flasher 1

Sent naked selfies to an unknown woman. Selfies were published in a women’s magazine. Broke a club-imposed booze ban. Scuffled with a security guard in Federation Square. Admitted to illicit drug use…after retiring from football…while trying to promote a book. Caught drink driving. His Humpday podcast was axed after he and Scott Cummings made jokes about issues of sexual assault and mistreatment of women.

Travis Cloke

Flasher 2

Sent naked selfies to an unknown woman. Selfies were published in a women’s magazine.

Nathan Buckley (coach) and Brent Sanderson (assistant coach)

Buckley and Sanderson played a seemingly innocent game of tennis which was in breach of the AFL’s COVID-19 bio-security protocols in 2020, and the Collingwood coaches were served a $25,000 fine and forced to self-isolate for 24 hours.

Jordan de Goey

Blamed his dog.

Injured his hand during a late-night incident at a nightclub. Lied to his club, said he hurt his hand while playing with his dog. Made coach Nathan Buckley front the media and repeat the lie. Claimed alcohol was not a factor. Banned for 3 games, fined $5000, ordered to do community service. Arrested for drink driving, fined $10000 and suspended. Accused of assaulting a woman in 2015.

Lachie Keefe and Josh Thomas

Banned from AFL for use of performance enhancing drugs and illicit substances.

Jamie Elliott

One of the Frownlow urinators.

Arrested for urinating into a rubbish bin in North Melbourne in 2017 after enjoying himself too much at Derby Day.

Scott Cummings

His Humpday podcast was axed after he and Dane Swan made jokes about issues of sexual assault and mistreatment of women. The controversy also cost Cummings his role as AFL commentator on radio station 3AW.

Heath Scotland

Involved in a brawl which left one man unconscious at the Mulwala Ski Club near Yarrawonga. Formally charged with common assault, assault occasioning bodily harm and violent disorder. Given a two-year good behaviour bond without conviction. Also avoided conviction for an assault charge in 2005.

Steele Sidebottom and Lynden Dunn

Sidebottom and Dunn breached COVID-19 protocols after sharing an Uber and visiting the home of a Collingwood Magpies staff member in 2020. Sidebottom was seen near the staff member’s house the next morning and had to be driven home by police.

Jaidyn Stephenson

Banned for 10 matches after it was discovered he had bet on AFL games. Missed the remainder of the home and away season. Apparently bet on three games in which he was playing, and was also fined $20,000.

Quentin Lynch

Charged with drink driving, reckless driving and leaving the scene of an accident in 2004 after failing to stop at a random breath test.

Ryan Cook

Fractured the eye socket of a man and left him with 10 shattered facial bones during a fight at a pub in country Victoria in 2009. Fined $3500.

Sam Murray

Banned from AFL for 18 months for testing positive to cocaine. Claims he didn’t intentionally touch the cocaine.

These fine young men of Collingwood FC have all been nominated for The Frownlow Medal or The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame. Scotland was inducted into the hall of fame in 2020.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

These are the men indigenous players should aim to be like.

Image: NuNa

Damian Monkhorst and racism at Collingwod FC.

Damian Monkhorst played AFL for Collingwood. Damian Monkhorst was racist. He is proof of the systemic racism at the famous club which has only recently been called out.

Monkhorst racially abused Essendon’s indigenous star Michael Long during a game in 1995 and has earned a nomination for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

So significant was Monkhorst’s action that the AFL created Rule 30, which prohibits racial vilification during a sporting contest. It is actually the first sporting law in Australia to specifically prohibit racial abuse and preceded initiatives such as the Sir Doug Nicholls Round.

Monkhorst has been dragged into the racism controversy at his former club, but has he done enough to be inducted into The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame?

Image: NuNa