Gideon Gela Mosby smashes a man’s skull for a shot at The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame.

Former NRL player Gideon Gela-Mosby has earned a nomination for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame after being charged with smashing a man’s skull and assaulting another man. Gela-Mosby is accused of punching the men late one night in Cairns in November 2020.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL player Ben Barba is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

The victims claim that the former Cowboys player approached the two men on the street and threw a surprise punch at one man, fracturing his skull. Gela-Mosby then allegedly punched the second man when he came to the aid of his friend. As a result, Gela-Mosby was charged with assault occasioning bodily harm.

Gela-Mosby strengthened his bid for a place in the hall of fame with multiple driving offences. He committed his first offence in 2017 when he was caught driving without a licence. He then offended twice more in 2018, and on one occasion was caught driving to a bottle shop with an expired learner’s licence. He was fined multiple times and prevented from securing a driver’s licence.

Assault has earned many footballers a place in The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame, so will it prove a golden ticket for Gela-Mosby?

Image: NuNa

Curtis Scott caught on camera.

NRL player Curtis Scott will star in a new reality TV series called The Frownlow Medal: Caught on Camera, after submitting an audition tape in which he allegedly punched a man during a nightclub fight in Canberra.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The CCTV footage Scott sent to Frownlow judges is blurry, but appears to show the Canberra Raiders player punching a man several times. Scott’s supporters claim he broke the man’s nose and caused him concussion, but this is yet to be verified. Police were not involved in the incident and Scott has not been charged, which means he was able to get his hands on the CCTV footage and send it immediately to Frownlow headquarters.

The Frownlow Medal: Caught on Camera will feature footballers in pub fights and street fights, and footballers urinating in public or on police cars, as well as players pooing in other people’s shoes or taking illicit substances. Audiences can also expect to see drunken players dancing naked, plus exclusive footage of former first-grade players inside prison.

Scott is free to play the lead role in the exciting new series as he has played hardly any football in the last two seasons since moving to the Raiders. He missed a large chunk of the 2020 season after serving a suspension for clashing with police on Australia Day. He earned a patriotic nomination for Frownlow honours on that occasion when he was arrested by police who found him asleep under a tree at Moore Park, and claimed he resisted arrest. Scott was in contention to win The Frownlow Medal last year until all of the charges against him were dropped.

Scoring the lead role on a reality TV show is a popular career path for underperforming footballers, and is a path paved by Frownlow nominees such as Beau Ryan. Scott is hoping that his new found fame will help him finally win The Frownlow Medal.

Image: NuNa

Ever wanted to punch your boss?

Rod Owen felt like punching his boss, so one day the former AFL player did just that and in the process earned himself a nomination for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

The man known as ‘Rocket’ got so fed up one day that he lashed out at his boss. The punch broke the boss’ nose and jaw so badly that his face had to be surgically reconstructed with microplates and titanium screws. Owen was sentenced to 18 months in Dhurringile prison farm, and served nine months.

What was discovered only recently was that the boss provoked the hiding with a joke about paedophilia, and that Owen himself was molested as a child. He was abused by a man named Darrell Ray, who was his primary school librarian and sports coach. He was also abused by Albert Briggs, who was an official at the St Kilda club where Rod played as a child and an adult. Owen revealed that Briggs molested him in the change rooms before junior Grand Final at the MCG. Briggs left the club a hero, Owen eventually left in disgrace.

The abuse as a child traumatised Owen for years, and provoked drug, gambling and alcohol addiction.  At just 23 years of age, he’d accrued a $150,000 gambling debt and his alcohol and drug benders could last for weeks. He is remembered for 63-day bender, after which a teammate found him lying unconscious and bloodied in a gutter outside the Portsea pub. He was also caught drunkenly driving at 150 kilometres per hour down the Nepean Highway.

The highly-talented athlete also paid $30,000 in compensation in 2004 to a woman who complained that he had assaulted her outside a Melbourne hotel.

Owen’s story mirrors that of rugby union star Tony Daly, whose life spiralled into drug and alcohol addiction, and crime, in response to abuse he suffered as a child at boarding school. Both players have taken legal action against their respective schools.

Image:Nuna

Daniel Rioli backs Shai Bolton’s bid for The Frownlow Medal.

AFL player Daniel Rioli supports Shai Bolton‘s nomination for The Frownlow Medal and is ecstatic to receive his own after the teammates were involved in a fight at a night club recently.

The Richmond players were drawn into the fight when another man apparently acted inappropriately towards Rioli’s girlfriend. The altercation gave Bolton a fractured wrist, while Rioli was reportedly punched in the face and sustained a cut under his eye which required two stitches. Sources claim that Bolton stepped in to help Rioli with the unnamed patron.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Bolton will subsequently miss two to three games as the Tigers attempt to defend their premiership and remain the most dominant AFL team in recent history.

A nightclub fight is a great way to earn a nomination for The Frownlow Medal, and is just one of the off-field scandals used by 2016 medallist Corey Norman during his troubled career. However, Rioli and Bolton will find it tough to win the medal this year after their coach and club failed to take any punitive action against the players, arguing that they were both sticking up for their mates and were provoked. They can at least look forward to award’s night for The Frownlow Medal and The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame later this year where a drunken footballer is sure to hit on their girlfriends.

Image: NuNa