Brad Fittler’s offensive on air blunder.

Former NRL player Brad Fittler made a terrible on air blunder and has earned himself another nomination for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame.

Fittler was commentating on the game between South Sydney and Parramatta when a Rabbitohs player passed the ball to a teammate and got it back from his teammate before diving over the line to score, prompting Fittler to call the Souths player an ‘Indian Giver’ – not once but twice.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

The rugby league legend may not be aware but the term Indian Giver is considered offensive in the United States. The phrase has its origins in the early days of the colonisation of the US, and referred to the tradition of giving a gift and expecting a gift in return. It’s original use might have been innocent, but it came to describe people so ungenerous that they take back gifts as soon as they are given or immediately demand a present in return. In more recent times, it was used in a derogatory way to refer to First Nations people of North America.

The NSW Blues player and coach earned his first Frownlow nomination in 2018. He was once labelled ‘the drunkest human being ever’ by police after he was found lying outside Glebe Police Station in Sydney. On another occasion, he was drunk and half naked and tried to enter the hotel room of two women.

Fittler has now been given another chance to enter The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame, as well as free enrolment in a history course at an adult community college.

Image: NuNa

Kane Evans and his secret obsession.

NRL player Kane Evans has finally revealed how he passes the time between training sessions in the NRL bubble; by doing origami.

The front-rower confessed to his obsession as he sat on the reserves bench carrying a message on his wrist tape which read: “fold some c–t”. The obscure message has earned Evans yet another nomination for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

The message has landed Evans in yet more trouble with the NRL as it is considered offensive, but the Warriors player was quick to defend himself.

“I love origami, the ancient Japanese art of paper folding,” he confessed.

“I can’t tell you what the ‘c–t’ stands for, but I can tell you that I love origami. I just fold and fold and fold all day. I make animals, flowers, anything, I just can’t stop folding. With everyone talking about Tokyo and the Olympics I thought this was the best time to tell everyone how much I love it. I’ve been tryin’ a get the boys to do it in camp.”

This is his third nomination for Frownlow honours. In 2018 he was accused of a racist slur against an opponent during a game. He also appeared in a leaked video shadow boxing while fellow NRL player Dylan Napa pleasured himself.

Evans faces sanctions from the NRL, but in better news he has been asked to arrange the table decorations at the awards night for The Frownlow Medal and The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame later this year.

Image: NuNa

Exclusive: Mark Gasnier’s acceptance speech for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame.

Exclusive documents obtained through confidential sources reveal the content of Mark Gasnier’s acceptance speech should he be inducted into The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame.

The documents are a transcript of the voicemail Gasnier plans to play on the night, and are an indication of the player’s supreme confidence of induction alongside some of Australia’s footballing greats.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. Rugby League player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015 and former NRL player Ben Barba is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Gasnier’s unedited acceptance speech reads as follows;

“@&%#^&&Y  ##$$^  #*%$$^756*, @#&$^^##, #%$%&#$&, !@#%#%*@#$^$%&%^$@$%&%^,

!@^$#$^*@&$#%$^%$*#%^&

*#%^&@$%&%^*^%(&$%*^$*($^&*%^*$%^*$^&*$&*#%^*&#@#%*#^@%^$*#%^*, #^@$@#^@…happy.”

The former NRL player was nominated for Frownlow honours after leaving a famously lewd voicemail message on the phone of an unknown woman during a drunken night out with fellow players in 2004.

The message was so graphic that Gasnier was fined $50,000 and stood down from the NSW State of Origin team.

Gasnier was called to verify and comment on the content of the documents, but Frownlow judges could only reach his answering service, where they were invited to leave a polite and respectful message.

Image:NuNa