Bailey Smith quits AFL.

Bailey Smith has shocked Australia with news that he will quit the AFL to deal with mental health issues following his latest off-field scandal.

Smith was recently punished for appearing in a social media post holding a bag of white powder, and he raised mental health battles when discussing the incident with the media. He has since quit the sport entirely to start a new career.

“I will step aside from the AFL immediately,” Smith announced through a prepared statement.

“I have made this difficult decision for reasons of mental health. My battles with mental health have been well documented, even after my latest off-field scandal and subsequent nomination for The Fronwlow Medal.”

His next career move was as big a shock as his decision to leave the sport.

“I will spend six months of the year as a school teacher and the next six months as a nurse, so that I can gain a more accurate understanding of mental health struggles,” the Western Bulldogs star explained.

“I will teach secondary students, most likely as a PD/H/PE teacher, for the remainder of this year. I chose teaching because I want to learn exactly what mental health struggles look like. I want to experience the constant drain of secondary school teaching in underfunded schools where teachers are overworked and underpaid and constantly under attack from parents and students. I want to understand the mental health strain on people who are vital to the nation but are completely undervalued and often criticised by Australian society, in contrast to footballers who are adored for simply playing a game they love.”

“On a personal note, I want to feel what it’s like to be ignored, teased, criticised or even physically attacked by teenagers, including some who’ll become professional footballers in a few years time. If you’d heard the stories the boys tell in the locker room about their school days, you’d know what I mean.”

Australians were just as shocked to learn that a person with no teaching experience or qualifications could simply walk into a full-time teaching position, but such is the shortage of teachers in Australia – created largely through the mental health strain placed on teachers.

After teaching for six months, Smith then plans to work as a nurse.

“I will work as a nurse for similar reasons,” he outlined.

“I want to truly understand the mental health strain of working an extremely stressful and underpaid job which was made a lot worse during the pandemic, and was bad enough before COVID-19.”

“I want to live through the emotional and psychological strain of caring for sick, injured, scared, smelly, dirty, abused, unstable, violent, dying people on a daily basis without proper remuneration or even adequate personal protection equipment.”

“I also want to be on the other side when a professional footballer abuses drugs or alcohol and has to be saved from themselves.”

Bailey then explained exactly why he had chosen these two careers above any other.

“Above all, I want to know what it’s like to be given gratitude instead of a reasonable wage.”

The nursing and teaching jobs will keep Smith out of the AFL until June 2023. Will the social media darling be back in the AFL, and back into contention for The Fronwlow Medal?

Only time will tell. Or maybe he will be back on the field once he reviews his bank balance.

Image: AAP, James Ross

More details emerge in Bailey Smith saga.

Bailey Smith‘s chances of winning The Frownlow Medal have increased after more details of his off-field behaviour emerged. The AFL star recently earned his first nomination for a controversial social media image but apparently this is not his first scandal.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL star Jarryd Hayne is the most recent recipient.

Smith recently hit the headlines when an image went viral on social media showing him holding a bag of white powder and smiling. It is not clear what is in the bag, and there is no evidence Smith consumed the substance. Since that controversy, more details have emerged which increase his chances of beating the 19 other nominees for The Frownlow Medal in 2022.

The viral image was apparently taken at a party in late 2021, and at the same time another photo was taken showing Smith ‘wiping his nose after leaning over’. The implications are strong, although again nothing has been proven, and perhaps the Western Bulldogs player simply had a cold.

This is not all, however.

At the time the photos were taken, Smith was apparently on a mental health break from AFL, but took that break after an investigation into complaints that he was behaving badly at a Gold Coast club and had to be spoken to by authorities.

Also in 2021, Smith created yet more controversy just moments into his young career. He appeared in another social media video boasting of his intention to pursue temporary connections with various women during a night out with friends, and said so in a way that was in not at all romantic.

The behaviour of a true role model.

The social media star surrounded himself in controversy even earlier in his career when photos of him emerged on the internet apparently naked, or close to naked. Smith was not responsible for the photos, which had been doctored by someone else, but he famously reacted to the scandal by posting an emoji of an eggplant, and his many social media followers know exactly what that means.

Smith and his legion of fans are anxious to know if he will face consequences for his latest scandal, but the most important question is, has he done enough to win The Frownlow Medal?

Image: AAP, James Ross

What happens if Sam Fisher is not inducted into the hall of fame?

Supporters of Sam Fisher are concerned about what he will do if he is not inducted into The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame later this year. Fisher earned his nomination after recently being charged with dealing large quantities of illicit drugs between state borders.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL star Jarryd Hayne is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Teammates and people close to the former AFL player have suggested he turned to drug dealing due to personal issues including sporting injuries and the end of a romantic relationship, which sent him into depression.

‘The break-up f***ed him. She took the house, his superannuation, she got everything,’ a mate of Fisher’s told the Herald Sun newspaper.

Step 1 – Someone else has been blamed for a player’s downfall – in this case a woman.

Various articles in the media have also repeated the familiar tale that Fisher devoted himself entirely to football and was not prepared for life in retirement, and that the game, the club, his teammates and the players’ association should have done more to help him.

Step 2 – blame the game, the club, teammates and anyone else close to him.

Step 3 – blame the game for not setting players up for life after sport.

None of the articles mention the fact that Fisher is a grown man who earned a healthy income from professional football, and made the conscious decision to allegedly traffic drugs. Not just to buy or consume drugs, but to allegedly traffic them in such large quantities that police were apparently pleased to have discovered them.

Consider this:

Drug use and abuse is often prompted by trauma or personal setbacks, such as Fisher’s. Drug trafficking, however, required a degree of intelligence, meticulous planning, preparation and dedication. International drug cartels run like multinational corporations. Fisher was not (allegedly) El Chapo, but he was charged with trafficking a substantial amount of drugs.

If a romantic break up leads him to alleged drug trafficking, what will he do if he fails to win the greatest honour in Australian sport?

Maybe he’ll need to be locked up to be protected from himself.

Image: NuNa

Darius Boyd reveals shocking truth about SAS Australia.

Former NRL player Darius Boyd has proven that SAS Australia is nothing more than a lifeline for wayward footballers after he used the program to announce his nomination for The Fronwlow Medal Hall of Fame.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL star Jarryd Hayne is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Boyd admitted to adultery during a promotion for the reality TV show and blamed his cheating on mental health struggles. During the interview, Boyd linked his adultery to his difficult upbringing and the lack of positive role models in his life. He has now become one of these poor role models for a generation of young Aussie footy fans.

What he doesn’t say, however, is how all of these problems can be solved by appearing on a reality TV show. The former Australia and Queensland fullback is the latest wayward footballer to use a reality TV show to repair his public image after a scandal.

Joining Boyd in season 2022 of SAS Australia is Wife Beater Wayne Carey and fellow Frownlow nominees Barry Hall and Millie Boyle. AFL player Heath Shaw appeared on a previous season, alongside controversial NRL star Sam Burgess. Other Fronwlow nominees to appear on Australian reality TV shows include:

Brian Lake (AFL) – Survivor

Sam Thaiday (NRL) – Parental Guidance, Celebrity Come Dine With Me

Robert ‘Dipper’ Dipierdomenico – Excess Baggage, Celebrity Dog School

Wendell Sailor (NRL) – Dancing With the Stars, The Celebrity Apprentice

I’m A Celebrity…Get Me Out of Here

  • Anthony Mundine (NRL)
  • Barry Hall (AFL) (runner-up)
  • Brendan Fevola  (AFL) – Winner Season Two
  • Dane Swan (AFL) (runner-up)
  • Nathan Buckley (AFL)
  • Billy Brownless (AFL)
  • It could also be argued that Frownlow favourite Ben Cousins is himself a reality TV show.

All of these players have been nominated for Frownlow honours.

Will Boyd’s wife forgive him if he wins SAS Australia, or only if he earns a spot in The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame?

Image: NuNa

Jordan De Goey needs your support.

Australians are being asked to support AFL player Jordan De Goey as he struggles to cope with the self-inflicted scandals that have earned him three nominations for The Frownlow Medal this year.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

“Jordan’s had a tough year this year and it’s important that everyone in the country gets behind him in this time of need,” began a statement from the Collingwood Magpies.

“Aussies need to get behind one of their heroes, just as they got behind the diggers in WWI, and get him through this rough patch. The most important thing here is to protect Jordan’s welfare going forward, so that he can get back to playing great footy and being such a great Australian.”

Specifically, Australians are being asked to understand the hardship of the modern-day footballer and the enormous stress of being paid a fortune to play a game that you love, even while thousands of people lost their jobs during the pandemic. In addition, Aussies are asked to consider the stress of having to fly all the way to the United States, on a sponsor-funded trip, just to do a few sit ups and push ups.

“We’re also asking all Aussies to send positive affirmations and messages of support via social media, including a few ‘special’ photos if you know what I mean ladies,” winked his agent.

“He wouldn’t mind if people threw in a bit of beer money too.”

Aussies are also being reminded to support his sponsors by buying lots of Monster Energy drinks.

Image: NuNa

Dayne Beams receives a boost to his mental health.

Former AFL player Dayne Beams is feeling much better about himself since receiving a nomination for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame for a public spat with a venue manager while organising his wife’s birthday party.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Beams began arguing with a staff member of a venue in the Yarra Valley, Victoria, and the conflict spilled over into the venue’s website, his social media accounts and the mainstream media. The Collingwood premiership player complained that the stress of organising his wife’s 30th birthday, and the conflict with the staff member, had taken a toll on his mental health.

Beams claims he had difficulty with the staff member while trying to finalise the details of the party. The conflict prompted him to write a negative message on the venue’s website, and to threaten the venue with bad publicity across his popular social media accounts. The staff member then contact Melbourne radio station 3AW in response to the negative feedback, and claims Beams threatened to use his AFL status to harm the business.

Beams was quoted as posting:

“My mental health and confidence around organising this has taken a hit because of it and I think Shelley (staff member) should be ashamed. I will be recommending to everyone through my social media platforms and word of mouth to stay clear of Elina (sic) estate and Shelley. Really disappointing.”

One has to wonder how someone who suffers a mental health breakdown while trying to organise a birthday party ever managed to win an AFL premiership.

Fortunately for Beams, he has been invited to the awards ceremony for The Frownlow Medal and The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame later this year, where he doesn’t have to organise a thing. What’s more, he’ll be surrounded by other wayward footballers who can empathise with his struggles and give him a shoulder to cry on.

Image: NuNa

Daniel Conn, role model.

Former NRL player Daniel Conn has demonstrated why professional footballers are great role models after throwing a rock through a window and intimidating staff at a gym. The attack in late 2019 earned the Instagram model a conditional release order and a nomination for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL player Ben Barba is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Conn recently pleaded guilty to destroying property, intimidation and breaching an AVO after throwing a rock through a window of the Hustle Boxing gym in Potts Point last year and for returning to his former workplace despite being told to leave.

Like many wayward footballers and criminals, Conn attempted to blame mental health issues for his wrongdoing and claimed he has attempted to take his own life on three occasions. Conn also claimed that school did not prepare him for life after league because he was sent there just to play football. This may surprise staff at St John’s College, Dubbo.

The former Roosters, Bulldogs and Raiders backrower was also found guilty of faking painkiller prescriptions. In 2008, Conn presented a false prescription for Valium and Tramal at a Gold Coast pharmacy. During the subsequent investigation police discovered that he had used another false prescription the previous year. Conn refused to be interviewed by police and was fined $5000 and ordered to do community service.

As well as appearing in court on numerous occasions, Conn appeared all over social media and on TV. He was the face of the F45 gym franchise and was at one time their global athletic director, and appeared on the Australian edition of the UK reality TV show Geordie Shore, as well as the show Ex On The Beach.

Breaching an AVO, intimidating gym employees and faking drug prescriptions are not normally enough to earn a prized place in The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame, but Conn’s appearance on TWO reality TV shows has raised his chances enormously.

Conn’s next chance to be the centre of attention will be at the awards night for The Frownlow Medal and The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame later this year.

Image: NuNa