Jamil Hopoate wins a Wife Beater Tattoo.

Jamil Hopoate is the latest footballer to win The Frownlow Medal Wife Beater Tattoo after pleading guilty to assaulting his partner. Hopoate should be behind bars but avoided the sentence because he contracted COVID-19, and is now the only person in the world to celebrate catching the disease.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL star Jarryd Hayne is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

The Wife Beater Tattoo combines two of the great loves of many professional footballers: tattoos and mistreating women.

The former NRL player and son of John Hopoate pleaded guilty to the assault of his partner, which occurred in front of a child, at the Panthers Port Macquarie club in December 2020, and was sentenced to a 12-month sentence to be served in the community by way of an intensive corrections order. He pleaded guilty to seven offences, including two counts of common assault – domestic violence related, one count of common assault, two counts of stalking/intimidation, as well as driving without a license and mid-range drinking driving.

During court proceedings, Jamil’s lawyer blamed his actions on the pressure of living up to the name of his father, who played representative NRL, but is more famous for countless on-field and off-field scandals. John was inducted into The Fronwlow Medal Hall of Fame in 2016, and Jamil followed him in 2021.

Jamil’s brother, Will, also played NRL and avoided any form of controversy during a career in which he represented NSW. Will only drew attention to himself when he took time out of the game, at the height of his powers, to carry out a religious mission. Jamil and Will grew up under the same roof.

Jamil’s lawyer said:

“It’s a hard thing to be told he will not play and not achieve the same level as his father and his brother. This caused issues and he responded inappropriately.”

Does this justify assaulting a woman?

Image: NuNa

Jamil Hopoate follows his father into The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame.

Former NRL player Jamil Hopoate has emulated his father John with induction into The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame. Hopoate Jr joins five other distinguished footballers to earn a place in the hallowed halls in 2021 alongside some of the greats of Australian sport.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Hopoate earned his place after being nominated for the medal and the hall of fame in the same year. While still contracted to the Brisbane Broncos, he was charged with three counts of common assault, two counts of stalk/intimidate intend fear physical harm, and mid-range drink driving, after an incident in Port Macquarie in late 2020. He later pleaded guilty to many of these charges.

But that’s not all.

In early 2021, Jamil allegedly got into a truck containing $155 million worth of cocaine, and sped through the streets of Sydney with the police in pursuit. He then allegedly jumped from the truck, dumped a backpack also containing cocaine and sprinted away from police in the suburb of Pagewood. He was eventually caught before he could ground the ball with downward pressure in the in-goal area.

He narrowly avoided prison after he contracted COVID-19, and after he was sacked by the Broncos, he became eligible for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame.

Jamil’s father John already sits in the hall of fame for his infamous finger incident, as well as numerous other off-field scandals during and after his career. Jamil himself spent time in prison after assaulting two men outside a pub in Sydney in 2014, for which he was sacked by the Manly Sea Eagles. After pleading guilty to domestic violence, he earns the coveted Frownlow Wife Beater Tattoo.

Nathan Bock also has a Wife Beater Tattoo and this earned him his place in the hall of fame. The former Adelaide Crows defender and All Australian representative was charged with assault and property damage and accused of causing his girlfriend ‘considerable pain’ after slapping her and throwing a beer in her face. A court handed him a 12-month good behaviour bond and a $200 fine, while the Crows slapped him with an ‘indefinite’ suspension from the club – which lasted only one game.

Bock later apologised through a prepared statement while his lawyer, Stephen White, was reported as saying,

“…in the context, these are not serious assaults,” before adding,

“…he is very mindful that he is a role model to younger people.”

Charitable assault

Ben Rogers was inducted after assaulting someone in the name of charity. The former NRL player was found guilty of two counts of assault occasioning actual bodily harm during a fight at a taxi rank involving two men and a woman.

The incident occurred outside Wests Leagues in Lambton while Rogers was playing for the Newcastle Knights, and erupted at the conclusion of the Down Town Ball, a charity function in support of Down Syndrome NSW, for which Rogers was the Hunter Region ambassador. Two men suffered facial injuries and one required stitches in hospital.

Rogers received a twelve-month good behaviour bond and a $1000 fine, and was stood down by the Knights.

Uncharitable assault

Former NRL player Gideon Gela-Mosby was charged with smashing a man’s skull and assaulting another man late one night in Cairns in November 2020.

The victims claim that the former Cowboys player approached them on the street and threw a surprise punch at one man, fracturing his skull. Gela-Mosby then allegedly punched the second man when he came to the aid of his friend. As a result, Gela-Mosby was charged with assault occasioning bodily harm.

Gela-Mosby secured his place in the hall of fame with multiple driving offences. He committed his first offence in 2017 when he was caught driving without a licence. He then offended twice more in 2018, and on one occasion was caught driving to a bottle shop with an expired learner’s licence. He was fined multiple times and prevented from securing a driver’s licence.

The Alcoholic

NRL star Jason Smith confessed to years of drug and alcohol abuse and was charged with drug possession offences after ending a football career in which he represented Australia. His lawyer encouraged people to have a drink with him to help him through troubled times.

Encouraging people to have a drink with a recovering alcoholic may seem a little odd, but this is the exact advice given to the people of Toowoomba and Queensland by lawyer Chris Hannay, who represented Smith during his court hearings for possession of cocaine, and who believed it would help the Qld State of Origin hero to get his life back on track.

During the court proceedings and afterwards, Smith confessed to years of alcohol and drug abuse, and claims he considered suicide. He was also implicated in the drug supply ring which earned prison sentences for two other former NRL players and Frownlow nominees, Matt Seers and John Touma.

The News Maker

Former AFL player Jake Carlisle was filmed by A Current Affair snorting cocaine on the same day that he was traded from Essendon To St Kilda in 2015.

And they say all publicity is good publicity.

Carlisle received a two match suspension for his actions, but it didn’t damage his form too much, because he was already serving a suspension for his role in the Essendon performance enhancing drugs saga.

Carlisle’s appearance on A Current Affair does make one ponder…is “Footballer Snorts Cocaine” even a news story these days? Maybe only if they bite a dog at the same time.

St Kilda Club officials claimed he faced a much harsher penalty than a media grilling upon his arrival at St Kilda.

“…he’s got to front Nick Riewoldt and our leadership group,’ they explained.

The club extrapolated on the reaction of the leadership group.

“They’re absolutely filthy. They’ve done a lot of work to really be clear on what it is they want our club to stand for.”

To find out exactly what Australian football clubs stand for, go to www.instagram.com/thefrownlowmedal/

Image: NuNa

John and Jamil Hopoate join the Frownlow family.

Former NRL players Jamil and John Hopoate have become the latest father and son duo to be nominated for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame. Jamil was recently nominated for leading police on a car chase related to alleged drug importation and was nominated for both The Frownlow Medal and the hall of fame in the same year, while father John is the owner of the most famous finger in rugby league.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Jamil allegedly got into a truck containing $155 million worth of cocaine, and sped through the streets of Sydney with the police in pursuit. He then allegedly jumped from the truck, dumped a backpack also containing cocaine and sprinted away from police in the suburb of Pagewood. He was eventually caught before he could ground the ball with downward pressure in the in-goal area.

Young Hopoate will now most likely spend time in prison, for the second time. He was sentenced to 18 months in 2014 after being found guilty of a violent assault outside a Manly pub, while he was playing for the Sea Eagles. He and two friends brutally bashed two men and hit and kicked them while they were on the ground. Jamil also argued with security guards and fled the scene, and later defended himself by saying he had self-medicated with alcohol to deal with stress and anxiety.

The back-rower was welcomed back into the NRL, where he most recently played for the Brisbane Broncos. He’s lost his contract with the Broncos even before he was charged with assaulting his partner in Port Macquarie in late 2020. Police allege Jamil hit his partner to the ground, spat at security guards, threatened to bash them and fled the scene, leaving behind the mother of his nine-month-old child. His partner was taken to hospital, and he was later caught drink-driving.

Father John was inducted into the hall of fame in 2016 after multiple nominations for offences such as playing rugby union under a false name, inserting his finger into a player’s private parts during a game, verbally abusing a touch judge and ball boy, and for numerous charges of assault.

John and Jamil now join the following father and son pairings who are already part of the Frownlow family:

Jim and Andrew Krakouer (AFL)

Gary Ablett Jr and Sr. (AFL)

Daniel and Roger Kerr (AFL)

Wendell and Tristan Sailor (NRL)

Image: NuNa

Jamil Hopoate surpasses his father.

Every father dreams that their children will outshine them in life, so John Hopoate must be brimming with pride after son Jamil was recently arrested and nominated for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame for leading police on a car chase related to alleged drug importation. Jamil now achieves the rare honour of being nominated for both The Frownlow Medal and the hall of fame in the same year.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Jamil allegedly got into a truck containing $155 million worth of cocaine, and sped through the streets of Sydney with the police in pursuit. He then allegedly jumped from the truck, dumped a backpack also containing cocaine and sprinted away from police in the suburb of Pagewood. He was eventually caught before he could ground the ball with downward pressure in the in-goal area.

Young Hopoate will now most likely spend time in prison, for the second time. He was sentenced to 18 months in 2014 after being found guilty of a violent assault outside a Manly pub, while he was playing for the Sea Eagles. He and two friends brutally bashed two men and hit and kicked them while they were on the ground. Jamil also argued with security guards and fled the scene, and later defended himself by saying he had self-medicated with alcohol to deal with stress and anxiety.

The back-rower was welcomed back into the NRL, where he most recently played for the Brisbane Broncos. He’s lost his contract with the Broncos even before he was charged with assaulting his partner in Port Macquarie in late 2020. Police allege Jamil hit his partner to the ground, spat at security guards, threatened to bash them and fled the scene, leaving behind the mother of his nine-month-old child. His partner was taken to hospital, and he was later caught drink-driving.

Father John is the owner of rugby league’s most famous finger, and earned numerous nominations for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame, for playing rugby union under a false name, verbally abusing a touch judge and ball boy, and for numerous charges of assault – but he never went to prison.

Jamil can now look forward to reuniting with some of his prison buddies, and playing for the rugby league prisoners team, which includes some very talented former first-grade players.

Image: NuNa