Anthony Milford does something newsworthy.

Anthony Milford Arrested for Assault is a better headline than ‘Anthony Milford Overpaid’ or ‘Anthony Milford Out of Form’. It’s also more likely to win him The Frownlow Medal in 2021.

The NRL player made headlines recently after being arrested in Brisbane for alleged assault of three people in the early hours of the morning. He was charged with three counts of assault occasioning bodily harm and one count of wilful damage.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

Milford is alleged to have become involved in an argument with his wife, and mother of his young child, as well as other people. He is said to have fled the scene. Police then hunted him though the streets of Fortitude Valley and arrested him, before making him spend the night in a police cell.

Alleged assault is also far more impressive than the incidents which earned Milford his previous Frownlow nominations. He was nominated for ‘liking’ Israel Folau’s famous homophobic social media post, and in previous years was nominated for a drunken incidents at the Canberra Raiders, and for breaking team curfew with the Queensland State of Origin team.

He leaves the Brisbane club this year after seven lacklustre seasons, and this could be the most memorable thing he does for the Broncos. Rabbitohs fans must be happy that they are already getting their money’s worth out of their 2022 recruit.

The alleged incident occurred near a nightclub called Ella Sabe, Spanish for She Knows. What does she know?

Image: NuNa

The Frownlow Medal welcomes back two of its biggest stars.

The Frownlow Medal is delighted to welcome back into its family Israel Folau and Jack de Belin after both moved one step closer to resuming their football careers. Folau and de Belin have been locked out of Australia’s most prestigious award but could return to the field very soon.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

Former NSW Blue de Belin is set to play for the St George-Illawarra Dragons reserve-grade team this weekend against Western Suburbs, and once he inevitably returns to first-grade, he will be eligible for The Frownlow Medal. Folau, meanwhile, has launched legal action to force his way back into the NRL via the Queensland lower-grade competition.

Tyhe back-rower has been allowed to play again after his court case for alleged sexual assault dragged on for years but was unable to find a verdict, and all charges were dropped. Folau was kicked out of rugby league and rugby union after multiple homophobic social media posts, but is desperately seeking Frownlow eligibility via a legal case funded by one of Australia’s richest men, Clive Palmer.

Folau’s legal team have accused the NRL and The Frownlow Medal of religious discrimination, and argue that:

“…Israel doesn’t drink, smoke or take drugs. He has never been charged with a criminal offence, he hasn’t assaulted any women…”

How then does he expect to win The Frownlow Medal?

Folau’s many supporters argue that his social media posts should never have been punished because they are an example of free speech.

NSW rugby league officials, meanwhile, have promised to provide extra security for de Belin “to ensure Jack de Belin’s return to rugby league is conducted in the right spirit”. They have advised that “…if anyone goes there with the intention of trying to disturb anyone’s proper enjoyment of the day, we need to be ready to deal with that…” and that anyone planning to display “offensive signs” aimed at de Belin will have those signs removed.

So much for free speech.

Image: NuNa

Israel Folau opens yet another lawsuit.

Former football star Israel Folau has launched legal action against The Frownlow Medal claiming he did not win the award due to religious discrimination. Folau claims his numerous homophobic social media posts warranted a medal and that he will seek compensation through the courts.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

Folau has never won the biggest prize in Australian sport, despite being nominated in 2018 and 2019, and despite playing first-grade AFL, for the Wallabies, and for the Queensland State of Origin team. He is also attempting to fight his way back into the NRL, so he can take another shot at winning The Frownlow Medal.

The cross-code star revealed his intention to sue the judges of the prize during a press conference for his planned return to football with the Southport Tigers lower-grade rugby league team in Queensland. Folau has not played professional football of any kind in Australia since his latest homophobic social media post cost him his contract with Rugby Australia.

He claimed to be very confident of winning the court case as he has the financial backing of Clive Palmer and the most powerful ally of all – The Lord Almighty. Folau also accused the Frownlow judges of religious discrimination in not giving him the medal, which went to Karmichael Hunt in 2018, and Ben Barba in 2019, neither of whom profess any strong religious devotion.

Judges of the medal deny any accusations of religious discrimination, or any other form of discrimination, and invite Folau to read the articles on this website, and to peruse http://www.instagram.com/thefrownlowmedal to see that all nominees are judged by their actions alone.

Image: NuNa

Jarryd Hayne vs Israel Folau in Battle of the Christians.

Israel Folau could face off against Jarryd Hayne for The Frownlow Medal in 2021 if the banished cross-code star is allowed back into professional football. The showdown is being billed as Battle of the Christians but can only happen if the NRL or Super Rugby let Folau sign a professional contract.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

Battle of the Christians would be magnificent,” claimed event promoters, the Australian Christian Lobby.

“In one corner is Jarryd Hayne, convicted rapist and Hillsong Church member. In the other corner is Israel Folau, a member of Truth of Jesus Christ Church and Australia’s most famous homophobe. It is only fitting that these two role models fight for Australia’s most prestigious medal.”

“This showdown would be bigger than the Crusades, bigger than the Reformation, bigger even than one of Paul Gallen’s boxing matches.”

The showdown is only possible if the NRL welcome Folau back to the code after he was kicked out of Rugby Union and Rugby League for one too many homophobic tweets. So desperate are event organisers to see Folau take on Hayne for the medal that they initiated a social media campaign under the hashtag LetHimPlay.

“This is a widespread and expensive campaign, and shows how serious we are about seeing two devout Christians contest The Frownlow Medal.”

“Many punters doubt Israel could defeat Jarryd for the Frownlow this year,” continued the spokesman.

“Yes, Jarryd was found guilty of rape, but if Israel was allowed to return, that would give him a licence to make increasingly outrageous and homophobic statements an a daily basis. Again, it might be argued that they’re only words, and nothing compared to sexually assaulting a young woman, but advocates and workers in various sectors remind us that deeply homophobic comments can have a devastating effect on members of the LGBTQI community, especially young people, and especially when those comments come from an athlete who is held up as a role model.”

“There could be grave consequences to giving Israel a platform to exercise his right to free speech. Consequences that would put him in contention to win The Frownlow Medal.”

The Australian Christian Lobby also advised against mocking their media campaign to have Folau reinstated.

“Remember, Scott Morrison is a fairweather football fan and a member of the Pentecostal church which shaped Jarryd Hayne, so we are confident of our influence in the halls of power. Admittedly, Israel did claim that Scott would go to hell, but Israel says that about everyone outside the 30-strong congregation of his church, and the PM has a famously short memory when it suits him.

What’s more, Frownlow judges even nominated a woman this year, so Israel certainly deserves a nomination.”

Image: NuNa

Ben Barba wins The Frownlow Medal for 2019.

Former NRL player Ben Barba has won The Frownlow Medal for 2019 after being kicked out of the NRL for the second time in his career.

The 2012 Dally M Medallist lost his contract earlier this year after being charged with public nuisance, and was first banished from the NRL for the use of cocaine.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015.

Barba was caught on security cameras during the pre-season in a heated argument with his partner, and the mother of his children, at a venue in Townsville. The North Queensland Cowboys tore up his contract and he was banned indefinitely from the game in Australia. The flying fullback earned his first Frownlow nomination in 2016 when he was caught with cocaine just moments after his heroic role in Cronulla’s first ever premiership win.

Barba beat the strongest field ever in Frownlow history, including fellow Cowboy Scott Bolton. Bolton pleaded guilty to common assault of a woman and served a lengthy suspension from the NRL. This was one of many incidents of violence against women in 2019.

Zane Musgrove was kicked out of the NRL for the second charge of violence against women during his career, while rookie Liam Coleman was charged for the same reason.

Dylan Walker was a strong contender before his partner dropped charges of domestic violence against him, and he was found not guilty, while Jarryd Hayne and Jack De Belin are still involved in legal cases for alleged sexual assault.

Rugby League players clearly dominated the awards yet again this year. In fact, Barba’s victory means that every medallist has played in the NRL, including code-swapper Karmichael Hunt.

Manase Fainu earned his nomination after being charged with stabbing a man outside a church dance. Many parents are now wondering whether it is safer to let their children play Rugby League than go to a church dance. Fainu will also have to wait until 2020 to learn his fate before the justice system.

Australia’s most famous homophobe, former Rugby Union player Israel Folau, created the most controversy this year with his divisive social media posts, but his actions were simply not enough in comparison to accusations of violence against women.

Jaidyn Stephenson flew the flag for the AFL. He had himself banned for 10 games for illegal gambling, but the challenge from Aussie Rules was fairly weak this year.

The A-League is a perennial poor performer in The Frownlow Medal, but bolstered its representation when four young players were simultaneously investigated for…you guessed it…group sex. After all, footballers can hardly be expected to enjoy the company of a woman all by themselves.

A number of Rugby League players were nominated for sex tapes, adding some spice to the competition yet again.

Even the Australian Rugby League captain earned a nomination. Greg Inglis was caught drink driving and was fined and stripped of the honour of captaining his country. He then retired from the sport after an injury-plagued career.

Barba and his fellow nominees will be resting sore heads in 2020, after the famous Frownlow awards night. Meanwhile, we anticipate another year of off-field drama in 2020.

Happy New Year Ben.

Image: NuNa

Australia’s biggest homophobe fails to win The Frownlow Medal.

Former Rugby Union player Israel Folau has failed in his bid to win The Frownlow Medal, despite posting a homophobic message on social media which sparked a huge social controversy.

Folau claimed that homosexuals will go to Hell, in accordance with his conservative Christian views. The post cost Folau his multi-million dollar contract with Rugby Australia and divided opinion across the country.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015 and code-swapper Karmichael Hunt was the most recent recipient

The talented footballer was sacked because he had already been warned about a similar post some months earlier. He then engaged in a lengthy court battle with Rugby Australia and missed out on playing in the world cup where the Wallabies performed poorly.

The post set off one of the most controversial debates of the year, as politicians, talk back radio hosts, breakfast show presenters, Christians, the LGBTQI community and members of the public shared their views on the topic.

The enormous controversy, however, was still not enough to win Folau the biggest prize in Australian sport.

Why not?

Because 2019 was the most most competitive year in the history of The Frownlow Medal, with players being charged with sexual assault, violence against women, stabbing, drug and alcohol abuse and gambling on their own games. A misguided social media post was simply not enough this year.

The controversy also means that one of the most talented footballers of the modern era may never play League or Union again. He will never play AFL again, but is unlikely to be missed by fans of that sport.

He’ll be forced to watch football, and The Frownlow Medal, from the sidelines. At least his Frownlow failure will give his army of Christian soldiers something else to complain about.

Image: NuNa

Jarryd Hayne calls for Hillsong to host Frownlow awards night.

Rugby League star Jarryd Hayne believes the awards night for The Frownlow Medal must be held at Hillsong Church in Sydney’s western suburbs.

Hayne is a member of the hugely popular Evangelical megachurch and is a favourite to win The Frownlow Medal in 2019 after being charged with sexual assault.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015 and code-swapper Karmichael Hunt was the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Hayne believes Hillsong Church is a superior venue to The Star, Sydney, which is the traditional home of the award’s night for the most prestigious award in Australian sport.

“Sure, lots of guys have been nominated for stuff that happened at The Star,” Hayne conceded.

“Even Corey (Norman, 2016 Frownlow Medallist) got busted with pills there, but Hillsong is better – it rocks. It’s a huge venue, they have wicked concerts and stage shows and the atmosphere is massive,” he argued.

The former NRL player, who has not been found guilty of sexual assault, also believes it could attract distinguished guests to the ceremony.

“We could get ScoMo to go. He loves new age Pentecostal churches and he’s a huge footy fan. He could hand out the awards. I reckon if we told him he could wear a baseball cap and sink some schooners, he’d do it for sure.”

Holding the ceremony at Hillsong may also appease two other leading candidates, Israel Folau and Manase Fainu, who have an affinity with churches in the western suburbs of Sydney. Folau lost his multi-million dollar Rugby Union contract for expressing views he cultivated at a church in western Sydney, while Fainu will soon face court after being accused of stabbing someone during a brawl outside a church in western Sydney.

Hillsong faces strong competition for hosting rights. The Star is a very popular haunt with Frownlow nominees, while La Favela nightclub in Bali is where recent nominees Nelson Asofa-Solomona and David Fifita attracted the attention of Frownlow judges.

Wherever the event is held, all in attendance are sure to be filled with some sort of spirit.

Image: NuNa

Jack de Belin vs. Jarryd Hayne. The showdown for The Frownlow Medal.

Jarryd Hayne and Jack de Belin could fight out The Frownlow Medal in 2019 after both being charged with alleged sexual assault.

The two high-profile Rugby League players are currently leading the race for the most prestigious award in Australian sport, ahead of part-time porn stars, nudists, drunks, thugs, drug addicts, bigots, gamblers, drink drivers and taxi slappers.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015 and code-swapper Karmichael Hunt was the most recent recipient.

Standing in the way of Hayne and de Belin winning the award are their lengthy court cases, and a long list of fellow footballers putting their hand up for the prize. The legal proceedings which will determine the players’ innocence or guilt may not be finished by the time The Frownlow Medal is announced later this year, which throws the competition wide open.

Every winner of The Frownlow Medal so far has played Rugby League, and NRL players dominate the nominations again this year.

Scott Bolton and former Cowboys teammate Ben Barba are in contention, while Zane Musgrove and Liam Coleman still have a chance, despite being kicked out of the NRL. Dylan Walker was nominated for allegedly assaulting his partner, but was not found guilty, ruling him out of the race.

NRL players got nude this year, appearing on the front page of newspapers, on social media and all over the internet, in a desperate bid to be noticed. Some played Slap the Taxi and an entire club, the Cronulla Sharks, got themselves banned from a local venue due to the behaviour of some of their players.

AFL player Jaidyn Stephenson poses the biggest threat to NRL dominance, as he has earned the longest suspension from the game, serving 10 games on the sideline after being found guilty of betting on AFL games. AFL colleague Majak Daw provided the most bizarre incident when his body was found beside the Yarra River.

Israel Folau could follow fellow code-hopper Karmichael Hunt and take out The Frownlow Medal, after refusing to remove a homophobic post from social media and losing his contract with Rugby Australia. A host of fellow footballers, including AFL player Gary Ablett Jr. earned Frownlow nominations for ‘liking’ his posts.

The A-League continued its poor showing in The Frownlow Medal, with only Ken Ilso nominated for testing positive to a banned substance.

As the winter codes near the business end of their respective seasons, the race is well and truly on for The Frownlow Medal.

Image: NuNa

Israel Folau seeks divine intervention in the race for The Frownlow Medal.

Rugby Union player Israel Folau has looked to the heavens for assistance to win The Frownlow Medal in what has become the toughest year ever to claim the prestigious award.

Folau asked the almighty to raise him above a depraved bunch of drunks, fornicators, exhibitionists and alleged rapists who have also been nominated for the most sought-after award in Australian sport.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015 and code-swapper Karmichael Hunt was the most recent recipient.

Folau refused to remove a homophobic tweet and when his contract was subsequently torn up by Rugby Australia, he earned favouritism for Frownlow honours. However, he faces tough opposition.

Challenging the controversial tweet are multiple allegations of violence against women. Rugby League players Jarryd Hayne and Jack de Belin are still involved in court cases concerning allegations of sexual assault, while Zane Musgrove was kicked out of the NRL for a case of violence against women. His partner in crime on that occasion, Liam Coleman, also remains in the running for the Frownlow.

Ben Barba, meanwhile, was accused of assaulting his partner and the mother of his children, and even though the allegations were dropped, they cost him his contract with the Cowboys and he is no longer playing in the NRL.

Dylan Walker was favoured to win, until he was found not guilty of assaulting his partner, which means that the front runner at this stage of the season is another Cowboys player, Scott Bolton.

Bolton pleaded guilty to assaulting a woman in a nightclub and, as a result, remains the only footballer to have been awarded a Wife Beater Tattoo, and is the player with the strongest claim to The Frownlow Medal.

Fellow NRL players have put their hands up. Micheal Chee Kam and Tautau Moga clashed with ride share drivers, and Jaeman Salmon was found guilty of driving offences. Meanwhile, Dylan Napa, Tyrone May, Tyrone Phillips and Coleman all appeared in lewd sex tapes on the internet.

The Folau tweet was ‘liked’ by in a host of fellow players from AFL, Super Rugby and the NRL, who also received nominations, while a number of AFL players earned nominations for alcohol-related incidents.

Ken Ilso is the lone nominee for the A-League, which yet again failed to match the other football codes in the race for The Frownlow Medal.

Image: NuNa