Meet Jai Arrow’s mystery guest.

Fans of the NRL will have the chance to meet Jai Arrow‘s mystery guest when he attends the award’s night for The Frownlow Medal later this year. And he won’t have to sneak her in.

Arrow was kicked out of the Queensland State of Origin camp for brining an unknown person into the team bubble and breaching strict COVID-19 bio-security protocols. He was also fined $35,000 and will miss two games for the South Sydney Rabbitohs.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The talented back rower knew he was breaking team rules, and knew the consequences. Just days earlier, most of the St George-Illawarra team had been fined and suspended for attending a house party, and Paul Vaughan had been sacked. Despite this, Arrow organised the rendezvous. He now leaves a hole in a Queensland team which is already missing David Fifita, as they try to prevent NSW from taking a clean sweep.

Arrow can console himself with his Frownlow nomination, and with the knowledge that he won’t have to smuggle his plus 1 into the Frownlow awards night, because anything goes. The only question is where the party will be held. So far, the leading candidates are Northies and Paul Vaughan’s house.

Image: NuNa

Paul Vaughan is ‘The Whale’.

NRL player Paul Vaughan will now be known as ‘The Whale’.

Why?

Because he’s always breaching.

What’s more, his Shellharbour neighbours now have another whale to spot along the Illawarra coastline.

Ok, yes, it’s a Dad joke, but hey, it’s lockdown, everyone’s going a bit crazy and it’s still not as bad as hosting a house party with your teammates in the middle of a pandemic which could shut down the NRL. The party has earned Vaughan his second nomination for The Frownlow Medal and could result in severe punishment for his St George-Illawarra teammates and possibly the club.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The house party was apparently attended by as many as 15 Dragons players and was thrown after players and staff were all given very strict instructions about socialising and personal movement outside of training and competition. Authorities found out about the party after neighbours apparently filed a noise complaint. News outlets are suggesting that the breach could force the NRL competition to stop, or at least destroy the Dragons’ season.

Vaughan earned his first Frownlow nomination in 2020, for a COVID breach. On that occasion, he signed into a cafe under a false name and was fined $10,000.

The prop will soon find out his punishment for this latest blunder, and whether the Dragons will be able to field a team when they play their next game in a fortnight. Meanwhile, he has offered his Shellharbour home as the venue for the Frownlow awards night later this year.

Image: NuNa

Canterbury Bulldogs nominated for The Frownlow Medal.

The Canterbury Bulldogs are the fifth football club to be nominated for The Frownlow Medal after they copped a massive fine for failing to advise their players of COVID protocols. Five players broke bio-security protocols when drinking at pubs in Sydney and some feared they could shut down the NRL competition completely.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

The Bulldogs club paid a $50,000 fine after Dylan Napa, Brandon Wakeham, Sione Katoa, Corey Waddell and Aaron Schoupp went out for a few drinks in Bondi and Coogee, in the heart of Sydney’s latest COVID-19 outbreak. The players were fined around $1000 each, but the club copped the biggest fine because the NRL found it had not done enough to advise players of the latest rules regarding player movement.

Canterbury is now the fifth club to be nominated for an award that is normally reserved for individual players. Fellow NRL clubs Cronulla Sharks and South Sydney Rabbitohs were nominated, alongside AFL clubs West Coast Eagles and Collingwood Magpies. The clubs earned their place among Frownlow hopefuls for offences such as covering up a player drug test and domestic violence accusations, to institutional racism, a racist social media post, and a Frownlow classic – having an entire team kicked out of a restaurant for drunken, anti-social behaviour.

Frownlow judges are hoping that the Bulldogs don’t forget to tell their players exactly where and when the Frownlow awards night will be held later this year.

Image: NuNa

Elijah Taylor joins The Breachers.

AFL player Elijah Taylor becomes the 17th professional footballer to breach COVID-19 bio-security protocols and has subsequently been suspended for the remainder of the season and nominated for The Frownlow Medal.

Taylor was punished after his partner entered the Sydney Swans’ quarantine accommodation in Western Australia without permission, which is breach of AFL and WA quarantine regulations.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL player Ben Barba is the most recent recipient.

Taylor’s mistake resulted in a $50,000 fine for the Swans and severe punishment for the young Swan.

Fans want to know if Taylor will ever play in the AFL again, and if he will sneak his partner into the awards night for The Frownlow Medal and The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame later this year.

Image: NuNa

Dragons star signs in as Paul Vautin at local cafe.

The Frownlow Medal can reveal that NRL player Paul Vaughan signed in under the name Paul Vautin at a cafe in the Illawarra and subsequently earned himself a nomination for the prestigious cross-code award. Vaughan’s alleged attempt to conceal his identity, and his visit to the cafe, are breaches of the NRL’s strict COVID-19 restrictions which players and team staff must obey in order for the competition to continue.

The NSW and Australian representative has not shared the name he allegedly used at the cafe, but The Frownlow Medal can reveal that it was the name of the retired Manly and Roosters player Vautin.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while NRL player Ben Barba is the most recent recipient.

Sources close to Vaughan explained the decision.

“Well, he says everyone calls him Paul Vautin anyway because their names sound so similar, and because Vautin is on the TV all the time. Plus, Fatty is not exactly known as being a genius so this is the kind of crazy thing he would do, and nobody would question it.”

No one has ever accused rugby league players of being intellectual heavyweights, and Vaughan’s actions support this theory. He chose to visit a cafe in the Illawarra, despite playing for a team based in the Illawarra, which has a very strong interest and tradition in rugby league. Yet he obviously thought he would go unnoticed.

Furthermore, Vaughan used the name of a proud Queenslander who lives in Queensland. Like most Queenslanders, he only leaves the sunshine state for a very good reason, and grabbing a coffee in the Illawarra is not one of them.

At least he didn’t sign in as Jack De Belin.

When a footballer gets in trouble for having a coffee at a cafe, you know we’re living in crazy times.

Image: NuNa