Payne Haas confesses to intimidation.

NRL player Payne Haas has admitted to intimidation but denies charges of intimidating police officers. The young superstar claims he was attempting to intimidate Queenslanders when he was arrested and that he would never mistreat police because “…they wear blue.”

Haas explained that he was hurling abuse at Queenslanders ahead of the 2021 footy season when he was arrested in Tweed Heads recently, because he is still angry at losing the 2020 State of Origin series.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015, while AFL player Elijah Taylor is the most recent recipient.

“I wanna win Origin this year,” stated Haas.

“I can’t believe we lost to their reserve grade team last year, and I’m not gonna go through that again this year – so I went as close to Queensland as possible and started just yelling stuff at random Queenslanders from across the border.”

“I just love intimidating Queenslanders, but I couldn’t get into the state because of the whole coronavirus restrictions, so I just had to yell at them from the other side of the river. If we wanna win Origin this year, we’ve gotta get in early, especially if they get all their top players back this year.”

Police arrested Haas on charges of intimidation and verbal abuse, and reports allege that he was intoxicated at the time.

“I still don’t know why I was arrested. I reckon the cops must secretly be Queenslanders.”

The talented prop was lost for words, however, when he was reminded that he plays his club football for Queensland’s most popular team.

It’s not the forward’s first run in with police. In 2019 he appeared in court over two drink-driving incidents, and in the same year he was suspended and fined by the Broncos for refusing to cooperate with the NRL integrity unit in relation to two off-field incidents.

Whether or not the young New South Welshman’s efforts prove effective will be known later in the year.

Image: NuNa

Mark Coyne forgets to tell the ARLC about his Frownlow nomination.

Former NRL player Mark Coyne forgot to tell the Australian Rugby League Commission about the greatest honour to be bestowed upon him during his illustrious sporting career.

Coyne was nominated for The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame after being arrested and locked up in Singapore for hurling abusive language at local police officers following an argument with a taxi driver at the end of a boozy night out. However, he opted not to inform his employer of the incident when it happened.

The Frownlow Medal is awarded to the player whose off-field demeanour epitomises the values of the modern-day footballer and draws attention to the status of footballers as role models to young Australians. It covers Australia’s four major football codes; the National Rugby League (NRL), Australian Football League (AFL), the A-League (Football) and Rugby Union’s Super Rugby competition. NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall won the inaugural medal in 2015 and code-swapper Karmichael Hunt was the most recent recipient.

The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame honours former players and players who received media attention in previous seasons, for similarly scandalous behaviour, and its inductees include Ben Cousins and Julian O’Neill.

Coyne was apparently arrested and thrown in the back of a police van, where he continued to swear at the police officers. The former Queensland State of Origin hero was put in a cell overnight and then had his passport confiscated for seven weeks while the incident was processed through the courts. He was fined $4000 for his explicit tirade and has been stood down as ARL Commissioner.

“I got arrested in f…… Singapore – so it doesn’t really count. I mean, you can get f…… arrested here for f……spitting, so I don’t think it really compares to being f….. arrested or thrown in prison in Australia, like so many other Frownlow inductees have been. That’s why I didn’t report it to the ARLC,” Coyne explained.

“To be honest, I was f…. embarrassed. I don’t know if I even deserve the f……. Frownlow nomination.”

Coyne is now involved in a major controversy, not just because of his behaviour, but also because he did not tell anyone about the incident. It is alleged that he only informed the ARLC after he was contacted for comment by a journalist in Australia.

The ARLC, which oversees the NRL, have not commented publicly on Coyne’s Frownlow nomination, but are said to be overjoyed that another member of the Rugby League family is in contention for the greatest award in Australian sport.

The former Dragons club captain has a few anxious months ahead of him, as he awaits the decision of the Singapore police, the ARLC and the judges of The Frownlow Medal Hall of Fame.

Image: NuNa